TWO DAPPER AFFECTIONATE GENTLEMEN IS NEWTON, KANSAS

AFFECTIONATE MEN_0005

Two affectionate men pose for their portrait in Newton, Kansas. The men look quite dapper in their suits and with their straw hats. Note that the gentleman wearing the suit and vest has a pocket watch chain visible atop his vest. He is also holding a walking stick.The man standing, and the man sitting on the hammock are showing some shared affection. They could be friends, relatives, or even lovers. It is impossible to guess their relationship. One wonders if homophobia was much of a factor in the cabinet card era in regard to men showing affection to men in public or in photographs. Perhaps a visitor to the cabinet card gallery can competently comment on this issue. The photographer of this image is the Tripp studio in Newton, Kansas. According to print on the reverse of the photograph, the studio was located on the corner of Main Street and Broadway. The photographer, Frank D. Tripp is cited in Anthony’s Photographic Bulletin (1896) as the President of the Photographers Association of Kansas. Another source states that Tripp “flourished” as a photographer in Newton during the 1880′s. Tripp’s obituary appears in The Evening Kansan Republican (1947). He died in Denver, Colorado at age eighty. He was described in the article as a pioneer photographer in Newton. He was an officer in the Newton Masonic Lodge. At some point he moved to Pueblo, Colorado where he was a partner in the Tripp and York photography studio.

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Published in: on February 24, 2013 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. There are several books written on the subject of affection between men of this era. Oddly, while completing an Ebay search on the subject (there are 100′s of photos on auction of this nature), today’s sellers assume and describe these photographs as gay or gay interest. Although I believe that gay men were subjected to a highly moral and religious code in the period, the photographs left behind are clear examples that men had less of an issue displaying their affection for their friends, brothers and comrades in arms than men do today.

  2. Excellent find again. Interesting subject too. I wonder, was there less stigma or less opportunity a century ago? There was certainly less understanding. There seems little written about homosexuality a century ago.


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