SIX FRAUEN (WOMEN) ALL IN A ROW IN CASSEL, GERMANY

SIX LADIESThis photograph was produced by G Ewald in Cassel, Germany.  The image shows six women standing in a row. They are showing a great deal of affection toward each other and seem to be having a good time. Writing on the reverse of the image indicates that the photograph was taken in 1904. The town of Cassel became known as Kassel in 1928.

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Published in: on April 22, 2013 at 12:30 am  Comments (11)  
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  1. tagged with “gay interest” @@
    why????
    just because two of these young women are holding hands?
    you ‘re kidding, aren’t you?

    • Yes I’m kidding and no I am not kidding. The not kidding part is disturbing. Many cabinet cards and other antique photographs that show displays of affection between same sex individuals are described as having “gay interest”. That is obviously ridiculous and the label is used to boost the amount of money or attention that the photograph garners from bidders or observers. However, there is also a reality to attend to. A number of the cabinet cards appearing in the cabinet card gallery have been copied and placed in gay internet sites and galleries. There is something about these photographs that people associate with “gay interest”. The question does exist if it is fair to the individuals in the images or to their descendants to place these photographs on such sites. I have heard a number of protests about this tactic. Unfortunately, the business side of antique photographs has had a negative effect on collectors. How many times have we seen somewhat dark complexioned subjects in cabinet cards be labelled as Black or Hispanic when it is clear that they are most likely NOT Black or Hispanic. People frequently see what they want to see when they look at cabinet card photographs. Seeing gay or other minority group subjects is increased by honest people swayed by the profit motive and by people governed by a total lack of integrity.

      • I understand – thank you a lot for this explanation!

    • i agree..it was normal than and now,they would be angry if they came to know they tagged as gay in next century

      • You will find different polls and surveys but actually less than 5% of the population is Gay. The problem is that Gays and Lesbians seem to proliferate in the entertainment field, media, and academia. These types want us to think the population of Gays is much larger than it really is – that generates more sympathy for LGBT types and hence more societal preferences.Also, they want to encourage young people to become Gay for their own sexual reasons. Whenever a movie star or celebrity dies it won’t be long before you read that he or she was Gay – without any .solid proof of course. And, of course, we are supposed to tolerate all sexual behaviors by Gays – we cannot pass judgment on anything they do.

      • “VIEWING HISTORY, CULTURE AND PERSONALITIES THROUGH CABINET CARD IMAGES” The preceding phrase is the heading I use to describe the purpose of the Cabinet Card Gallery. I would like to encourage visitors to leave comments that apply to the photographs and their place in history. I think that discussing the use of the term “gay interest” is fair game since it is a category found on the site. However, I do not want the site to become a forum for visitors to express their social or political ideologies. In addition, using language like “these types” to refer to gays or any other group, is unfair and inaccurate. There is diversity within all groups. Not everyone within a group thinks or acts identically. Ooops! Now I’m preaching! It is so easy to fall into the proselytizing mode. In sum, lets keep the comments focused on the photographs.

  2. I for one am so SICK of the over-sensitivity of Political Correctness. The “gay” label has offended me again and again. – All you need is two men standing there smiling with a hand on a shoulder and voila! – Do you know how many of my European relatives, both male and female do that? – And even hug and kiss!

    I too have found your “Gay Interest” feature offensive.

    It seems that the “olden times” were a time when people could be affectionate without being labeled. – Per blacks, Hispanics, etc., why even mention their “complexion”? How about “Man with hat.” or “Woman with Mantilla”? – Period.

    • I hope that you read my reply to Puzzle concerning the subject of using a “gay Interest” category. I do not like the label either and do not mention it in the body of the description of “gay interest” photographs. I use the category because there are a number of collectors who specifically seek out these cards. The term is certainly not meant to be derogatory. One can simply search the internet and find a number of sites aimed at a gay viewership that feature cabinet cards with same sex affectionate poses. In fact, many of the cabinet card gallery’s photographs have been hijacked to such sites. In regard to ethnic and racial labels; this is also a controversial issue. I would like to address your question about “why even mention their complexion?” I mention ethnic and racial groups in the title of appropriate cabinet card descriptions because it is relevant. It is relevant for two reasons. First, there are people who are looking for photographs of specific racial or ethnic groups. They may be seeking these images for historical reasons or genealogical reasons. They are motivated by pride or educational interest, not bias or prejudice. Quality examples of these ethnic/racial cabinet cards are relatively uncommon and there is an interest in locating them. Some of the ethnic/racial images have been used in educational books and documentaries. I doubt they would have been found without my employing labels. Labels aren’t always bad. They are not always an instrument of hate. Labels often exist for classification purposes. Labels make it easier to locate what one is searching for. Imagine trying to do a google search without utilizing labels. I really appreciate your comment as well as Puzzle’s opinion. Both of you have brought up interesting and important issues. I am giving serious thought to eliminating the “gay interest” category because it is so subjective. It is unlike categories such as “Female Photographers” or “Policemen”, in which photographs are placed within categories based on facts. However, I will continue to utilize racial and ethnic categories because these labels are part of the structure of our society and I am using them in a manner free of bias and discrimination.

      • Thanks for your detailed and thoughtful reply. – By the way, this is a terrific site!

        Very best.

  3. If I saw an old photo of my great great grandfather Otto lying in bed next to another gentleman, the only conclusion I would come to is that there was not another room/bed in the inn. – Unless CC wants to feature pics of folks actively and obviously cavorting in some sexual fashion, be it homosexual or heterosexual, they need not presume anything. – Besides, am I the only person in the world who is sick to death of hearing about what people do in bed with each other?

    • The issue of whether the cabinet card gallery utilizes a “gay interest” category has been very controversial. My previous comments (found above) have described my ambivalence about using this category and my ultimate decision to do so. However, since I posted the photograph above, I have not categorized any cabinet cards under the category of “gay interest” despite having opportunities to do so during this past twelve months. The fact that some people misinterpret my reason for having the category, and view it as biased, helped me decide to stop classifying photographs as “gay interest”. The reason I have not deleted the category from the cabinet card gallery site is that I think that the comments left by visitors about this issue are informative and thought provoking. I believe that future visitors to the “gay interest” photographs should have the opportunity to read comments like the ones above.


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