ARMED AND READY TO DEPLOY: SPANISH AMERICAN WAR SOLDIER IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

SPAN AM WAR SLDR_0002This Spanish American War era soldier is dressed, armed and ready to deploy. Note his long rifle and the bayonet he is wearing on his side. He is wearing two medals, one which the previous owner of the photograph identified as signifying that he was the son of a Union civil war veteran. This photograph was taken at Dempsie Portraits which was located at 316 Nicollet Avenue in Minneapolis, Minnesota. George M. Dempsie began operating in Minneapolis in about 1887 and worked until at least 1910. He was at the Nicollet Avenue address between 1889 and 1910. He operated under the names of Dempsie’s New Photographic Rooms, Dempsie Portraits, and Dempsie & Andrews. At various times he employed his sons George R. Dempsie and Guy C. Dempsie.

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HANDSOME YOUNG MAN WITH HANDLEBAR MUSTACHE IN MINNEAPOLIS, KANSAS

A well dressed and handsome man with a handlebar mustache poses for his portrait at the studio of H G Cole in Minneapolis, Kansas. The reverend Url R Hicks Almanac (1900) reported that Cole won a fifty dollar cash prize for “the best photograph of a moving tornado”. The 1880 US census finds the 30 year-old Cole working as a photographer in Minneapolis. He was of English extraction and born in New York. His wife’s name was Emma.

Published in: on October 19, 2012 at 8:33 am  Comments (2)  
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YOUNG FAMILY IN WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS

This cabinet card is a family portrait of a nicely dressed young couple and their baby. Mom and dad are wearing flowers and mom appears to be holding a cane or umbrella. The photograph was produced by the Flodin & Thyberg Photographic Art Studio in Worcester, Massachusetts. The photograph is dated 1889. Photographer, Ferdinand Flodin was born in Stockholm, Sweden in 1863.He came to America in 1883 and studied photography in Boston with a well known photographer named Ernest Ritz. He then studied under renowned Boston photographer, William Notman. He moved to Worcester in 1887 and partnered with August Thyberg in opening a gallery. After a time, Thyberg withdrew from the business. Flodin was a very productive writer. He had several articles published in photography journals. He also wrote an illustrated book on Sweden. In addition, he wrote an article which appeared in “Photographic Mosaics: Annual Record of Photographic Progress” (1895). The article was entitled “Our Reception-Room Showcase”. The Wilson Photographic Magazine (1903) reported that Flodin returned to Sweden in 1898 and operated a studio in Stockholm. The magazine article includes some excellent photographs of the Swedish gallery. August Thyberg was born in Sweden in 1863. He immigrated to the United States in 1884. His wife, Alma, was also Swedish. The United States census provides further information about Thyberg. In 1900, he was living in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and working as a merchant. In 1910, he lived in Springfield, Massachusetts and worked as a blacksmith. In 1920, he lived in Minneapolis and owned a shoe business. The 1930 census finds Thyberg retired in Minneapolis. It  is safe to say, that unlike his one-time partner, Flodin; Thyberg had  a difficult time sticking to an occupation.

YOUNG COUPLE LACKS INTIMACY IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

A young couple poses for their portrait at the studio of photographer, H. Larson, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.                The gentleman has long hair and glasses.  He has a scholarly appearance. The woman’s  figure is improved by a corset. She appears uncomfortable, illustrated behaviorally by the position of her arms and hands on her abdomen. This couple appears emotionally separated from each other. There is no intimacy captured in this photograph. Although the couple is posed together, they do not seem to be together. Perhaps the couple is really not physically together in the studio and this image was doctored by the photographer, who added the gentleman to an existing photograph of the woman. Herman Larson was a Swedish immigrant who came to America through Sweden in the early 1900′s. In Sweden, he held a degree of Master Photographer and was knighted by the King of Sweden for his excellent work there in the late 1800′s. In 1904 he established his photography studio in downtown Minneapolis. Much of Larson’s work came from the theological, church and public schools in the area. The studio remains in business today and its web site discloses that it still possesses Larson’s panoramic circuit camera. The site also reports that Larson semi retired in the early 1950′s.To view other photographs by Larson, click on the category “Photographer: Larson”.

Published in: on January 18, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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MAN WITH A LONG GREY GOATEE IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

An elderly man poses for his portrait at the studio of Arthur Rugg in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The man has a very distinguished appearance. His long grey goatee is his entry ticket into cabinet card gallery’s category “Beards (Only the Best)”. To view other photographs by Rugg, and learn of his unethical behavior as a photographer, click on the category “Photographer: Rugg”.

Published in: on September 13, 2011 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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THE OTHER BOOGIE WOOGIE BUGLE BOY OF COMPANY B……… IN ALBERT LEA, MINNESOTA

This cabinet card features a uniformed bugle boy, posed holding his instrument, and wearing a satchel bag strapped over his shoulder. The boy’s cap has a badge indicating that he was in company B of the “ALC”. “ALC” likely stands for Albert Lea C……”. Perhaps a visitor to the Cabinet Card Gallery can leave a comment identifying the “C” word. The bugle boy, judging by his uniform, was a member of a band. Albert Lea is the name of the Minnesota town where the photographic studio that produced this cabinet card was located. Albert Lea is ninety miles south of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and was named after a topographer with the US Dragoons who surveyed the area in 1835. The photographer of this cabinet card was Joseph A. Fuller (1851-?). Fuller was born in Walworth County, Wisconsin. He worked as a photographer in Decorah, Iowa and Chatfield, Minnesota; before moving to Albert Lea in 1873. At the time of this photograph, Fuller’s studio was on the corner of Williams and Broadway Streets, “over Brown & Cos Bank”. His later studios in Albert Lea included 202 South Broadway (1914-1922) and 204 South Broadway (1924). He worked in Minnesota from the 1870′s through part of the 1920′s.

NOTABLE MUSTACHE IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA (THE PHOTOGRAPHER WAS A SCOUNDREL)

This cabinet card features a gentleman with a very notable mustache and bushy sideburns. He looks like a very intense man as he stares at the camera. The man behind the camera was Arthur B. Rugg (1853-?). Rugg’s life story is likely similar to many men who pursued the occupation of photographer. Such a life requires much change; first, working for various photographers in various locations, and finally, making enough money to finance ones own gallery. Rugg, at age 17, was an apprentice to J. C. Moulten of Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Moulton took ill just three weeks after Rugg began his apprenticeship and Rugg was forced to be a quick learner. He operated the gallery by himself and at night consulted with Moulten in his sick chamber , receiving criticisms and instructions. Rugg operated the business on his own for three weeks and the business did not suffer with him at its helm. In 1873, Rugg opened his own gallery but it did not do well, so he moved to Boston and worked for a photographer there for the next two years. He then went to Florida to become an orange grower but he lost everything when the business failed. His next stop was New Orleans where he worked for W. W. Washburn in one of the city’s leading galleries. However, after contacting malaria, he was forced to move North and ended up in LaCrosse, Wisconsin where he worked for a year and a half for a leading studio there. In 1879, he moved to Minneapolis and purchased the studio of William Brown and soon Rugg became one of the leading photographers of Minneapolis. Rugg was also noted for being involved in a major lawsuit that had impact on the profession of photography. The American Journal of Photography (1890) reported that the Supreme Court of Minnesota handed down a decision against Rugg for selling a copy of Mrs. Ida E. Moore’s  photograph “which was put on exhibition in improper places, much to the discredit of the lady”. He was ruled to have had no right to the picture which legally belonged to the sitter (Ms. Moore). She won her suit for damages of five thousand dollars although it is not clear if that was the actual amount awarded. Another photography journal of that time reported more specifics of the case. It seems that Rugg had given one of Ms. Moore’s pictures to a police detective named Clark, who showed the photos in a number of houses of ill repute in the Minneapolis and St. Paul area. The court ruled that although the negatives of the photograph belonged to Rugg, he could not print photographs from those negatives without permission from Ms Moore. Mr Rugg seems to have lacked some ethics in this instance.  Now, back to that great mustache. To view other photographs of unusual mustaches, click on Cabinet Card Gallery’s category of “Mustaches (Only the Best)”.

DAPPER MAN WITH BIG MUSTACHE AND SMALL BEARD IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

A well dressed man with a large mustache and a clump of chin whiskers, poses for his portrait at the studio of Eggan, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. To see other interesting exhibitions of facial hair, visit the Cabinet Card Gallery’s categories of Beards (Only the Best) and Mustaches (Only the Best). It is difficult to identify the photographer of this photograph. The city of Minneapolis hosted a number of photographers that shared the name “Eggan”, each of them sharing the same studio address. Apparently the Eggan family, which was of Norwegian descent,  had a passion for photography. Photographers included Ole P., Halvor P., S. A., Sevor P., Stephen, and James Eggan.

Published in: on February 23, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (3)  
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HANDSOME FIREMAN IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

A handsome young fireman poses for his portrait at the photo studio of Miller, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The neatly groomed fireman is wearing his dress uniform and his badge identifies him as fireman #245 in his department. To view other cabinet card photographs of fireman; click on the Cabinet Card Gallery category, “Firemen and Policemen”.

WOMAN AND A MANDOLIN IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

A woman poses for her cabinet card portrait at the studio of Larson, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She is holding a musical instrument that appears to be a mandolin. Perhaps a visitor to this site can more confidently identify her instrument. Click on the category “Photographer: Larson” to view other photographs by this photographer.

Published in: on October 13, 2010 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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