THREE YOUNG SIBLINGS POSE FOR THEIR PORTRAIT IN NEW YORK CITY (PHOTO BY R. A. LEWIS)

This carte de visite portrait features three sisters posing for their portrait at the R. A. Lewis gallery in New York City. Each girl has a fabric band around just above their waist. My first impression was that the band was used by the photographer to discourage the kids from moving around during the photo shoot. I believe it is more likely that the bands are decorative. In fact, the two older girls are wearing identical dresses. In addition, note the handkerchief stuffed into the middle child’s dress pocket. Magnification confirms that it is a handkerchief and not a flaw in the photograph (see scan). Richard A. Lewis, the photographer of this image, was the son of William Lewis, a renownd Manufacturer of daguerreotype and wet plate cameras and other photographic apparatus. Richard opened a Daguerreotype studio in about the early 1840’s. Lewis moved his studio around New York City on several occasions. The Langdon Road directory contends that he was located at the 160 Chatham Street address (listed on this cdv) between 1864 and 1866 and through the 1880’s and 1890’s.

Published in: on August 23, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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PORTRAIT OF A LITTLE GIRL IN A STUDIO SNOWSTORM


This vintage real photo postcard features a a little girl
dressed in her winter clothing using her umbrella to 
protect her from falling snow.The little girl is adorable
and is wearing a very cute expression.The postcard is 
a New Years card. On the message side of the postcard 
is a sweet note from Aimee Banchet to her "Godmother and 
Uncle". Google Translate came up with a rough translation 
indicating that the card is a message from a niece 
to her Aunt and Uncle wishing them much love and happiness 
upon the New Year. The card is addressed to Mr and 
Mrs Martin who resided in the town of Chonon les Bains, 
France.The town is located in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
region of eastern France. The postcard is from the early 
1900's.The logo for the postcard publisher appears to
be "H.B.". Two postcard publishers used those initials; 
Hutson Brothers Ltd (London,England) and Hoursch & 
Bechstedt (Cologne,Germany).  

Published in: on August 22, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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INCREDIBLY ADORABLE AND FASHIONABLE CHILD IN OSCHATZ, GERMANY

The young child seen in this carte de visite is both stylish and adorable. The photographer did an excellent job capturing the essence of this child. Kudos to mom for being an excellent fashion coordinator. The photographer of this cdv image is Herm. Kocxyk. He operated a studio in Oschatz, Germany which is a town located in the Free State of Saxony. An inscription on the reverse of the cdv reveals that the photograph was taken in 1903. I was unable to translate the rest of the inscription other than “Our favorite ………”. Perhaps a visitor to the Cabinet Card Gallery can complete the translation.

Published in: on August 21, 2017 at 3:03 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WOMEN OF FRANCE (PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALFRED NOYER)

This vintage real photo postcard is part of a series named “Les Plus Belles Femmes de France” (The Most Beautiful Women of France). This series is about gem stones, and the model for this image represents “Topaze” (Topaz). There were a number of different series published. One of the more popular series was one in which models represented different French Provinces by wearing traditional clothing from that particular area of the country. This postcard was edited by well known photographer Alfred Noyer. The celebrated photographer supervised a large photo studio in Paris. The Noyer Studio operated from 1910 until the 1940’s. Many of his early postcards were reproductions of artworks. He also produced illustrated patriotic postcards during World War I. With the onset of the 1920’s he began producing postcards of children and women. Many of the postcards he produced of women were nudes or risque images. Some of his postcards list his name while others are simply marked “AN”.

Published in: on August 20, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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PORTRAIT OF A FASHIONABLE WOMAN IN LEEDS, ENGLAND (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)

This cabinet card portrait is notable for at least two reasons. First, the woman in the photograph is beautifully dressed. Note the matching trim on the cuffs of her sleeves, across her chest, and on her high collar. The second reason that makes this image special is that the photograph was taken by a female photographer. Alice Josephine Swithenbank operated the Elm Street Studio in Hunslet, Leeds, England. Hunslet is an inner-city area in south Leeds.

Published in: on August 19, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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SWEET BABY GIRL SITTING ON A PILLOW

This vintage real photo postcard features a very cute baby sitting on a pillow. The little princess is bright eyed and is smiling for the photographer. Note the loose necklace worn by this sweet little girl. The photographer of this image is unknown. His name and address are printed on the reverse of the postcard but time has made the print illegible.

Published in: on August 18, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  

PORTRAIT OF A HANDSOME YOUNG MAN IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

This vintage photograph features a well dressed handsome young man. He is wearing a three piece suit with all the accoutrements needed to make him very fashionable. He has a flower on his lapel, a tie tac on the knot of his tie, and a handkerchief in his jacket pocket. This photograph was taken at the Dorge studio in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Elias G. E. Dorge (1863-1915) worked as a photographer from 1891 until 1941. He worked most of his career in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Bulletin of Photography (1912) reports his purchase of a studio in Fargo, North Dakota. He worked in Fargo from 1911 until 1914. Before he went to work independently in Fargo, he had a partner who helped him operate the Dorge & Jansrud studio. Dorge was born in Norway and immigrated to America in 1881. He lived in Brooklyn, New York for about two years and then moved to Minneapolis where he worked as a photographer for 28 years. He was married to another Norwegian immigrant, Dorthea Batne. Dorge died suddenly of alcohol poisoning in 1915. Another source states he died of heart failure. This photograph measures about 4 1/8″ x 5 7/8″.

Published in: on August 17, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF GERMAN ACTRESS LISSI ARNA (PHOTOGRAPHED BY THE CELEBRATED MANASSE STUDIO)

This vintage real photo postcard features German actress Lissi Arna (1900-1964). She is known for the films “Harbor Drift” (1929, The Squeeker (1931), and Under the Lantern (1928). She appeared in German silent films and entered US films in 1930. She was an exotic femme fatale in German silents She was married to a doctor in 1939 and the couple lived in Venezuela until his death. She appeared in Hollywood in German language versions of American films. She was in the US for only one year and failed to get significant offers from any of the major studios. In the sound era she gradually lost her popularity and was confined to supporting roles through the 1930’s. The IMDb credits her with 62 films between 1915 and 1962. View the YouTube video below to see Lissi Arne appearing in “Under the Lantern” (1928).This postcard was published by Ross Verlag as part of a series (no. 4199/2). Miss Arna’s portrait was taken by the Manasse studio which was located in Vienna, Austria. There also was a branch of the studio in Berlin. The Manasse studio was in existence between about 1922 and 1938. The studio was run by Olga Solarics (1896-1969) and her husband Adorja’n von Wlassics (1893-1946). Olga was known for her interest in photographing nudes. The studio flourished in Vienna during the 1930’s. Many of the portraits taken by the studio had an erotic flavor. The studio attracted some of the leading ladies of film and theater. The studio was also involved in producing photographs for advertising. This husband and wife team of photographers were very talented and very successful in their profession.

PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY YOUNG GIRL IN COATESVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA (THE GREAT MEMORIAL CARD DEBATE)

This cabinet card portrait features a relatively close-up view of a pretty girl dressed in dark clothing. She appears to be in her late adolescence. Her photograph is presented as if it is on a scroll. I have come across much debate as to whether the “scroll images” are memorial photographs. After reading both sides arguments, I tend to believe that they are not necessarily memorial photographs. The teen seen in this photograph is wearing a hat that reminds me of an old adage, “A bird on the hat is worth two in the bush”. Perhaps I may be confused about that proverb but the young lady seen in this cabinet card is wearing a “bird hat”. This style hat is not one of my favorite examples of millinery design. At the turn of the 19th century it became the style in the US and Europe to wear feathers and even whole taxidermied birds on their hats. This resulted in the killing of millions of birds all around the world. An article in “Sociological Images” (2014) reports on a single order of feathers by a London dealer in 1892 requiring the “harvesting” of 6,000 Birds of Paradise, 40,000 Hummingbirds, and 360,00 of various East Indian birds. Ornithologists started to speak out in resistance to this practice. One asserted that 67 types of birds were at risk for extinction. Ornithologists and their supporters began to target women who were supporting the practice of slaughtering birds. Women were receiving the blame for the barbarism being committed against birds. The writer, Virginia Woolf (1882-1942) reminded readers that it was men who were actually murdering the birds and making a profit from them. Interestingly, middle class women were major advocates in the bird preservation movement. In the US the movement sparked the development of the first Audubon societies. The Massachusetts Audubon Society organized a feather boycott, and soon the US government passed  conservation legislation that protected the birds. The photographer of this cabinet card is J. B. Gibson who operated a studio in Coatesville, Pennsylvania. John Banks Gibson is reported to have been a photographer from the 1870’s until the 1890’s. He initially worked producing ferreotypes (tintypes). In 1893 he sold his business to photographer Robert Young. Gibson was born in East Nottingham, Pennsylvania and died in 1913 in Coatesville at 75 years of age. He learned photography as a young man from Alexander McCormick of Oxford, Pennsylvania.

Published in: on August 15, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (2)  
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BEAUTIFUL PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG BROTHER AND SISTER: GUARANTEED TO MAKE YOU SMILE

This terrific portrait features a young and well dressed brother and sister posing for their portrait at a photographer’s studio. However, the love and closeness that these siblings feel toward each other is very evident in this photograph. Nothing else is necessary to say about this adorable pair. This photograph is truly a “feel good” image.

Published in: on August 14, 2017 at 12:20 pm  Leave a Comment