PRETTY ACTRESS WITH POOR POSTURE IN LONDON, ENGLAND (LILIAN CARLYLE)

LILLIAN CARLYLE_0004A pretty actress exhibits poor posture as she poses in London, England, at the studio of Ellis & Wallery. The performers name is Miss Lilian Carlyle, and she appears to be pushing her chest out, possibly to amplify her ample bust. Is there a chiropractor in the house? Printing on the reverse of the photograph states that the studio was established in 1884.  The backdrop employed in this portrait is not particularly realistic but at least it doesn’t detract from the portrait and allows Miss Carlyle to be the major focus. Alfred Ellis (1854-1930) was an active photographer between 1884 and 1899. He operated a studio on Upper Baker Street in London. He was an original member and served in a number of offices for the Professional Photographers Association. He specialized in theatrical photography and sometimes photographed whole scenes inside his studio. He later went to theaters to photograph performers and play scenes. Ellis was very involved in working for copyright protection in the high courts. Between 1890 and 1900 Stanislaw Julian Ignacy, Count Ostrorog (1863-1935) joined Ellis in a studio partnership. Ostrorog had followed in the footsteps of his father Stanislaw Ostrorog (1830-1890). He also kept his father’s “photographer name”. The senior Ostorog had changed his name to “Stanislaw Walery” for professional purposes. The last name of “Walery” was derived from his wife’s name, “Waleria”. The elder Walery had set up his London studio in 1883. To view other photographs by Walery, click on the category “Photographer: Walery”.

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3 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Actually, she displays what would have been fashionably proper posture in her day! That is an example of the “Grecian bend”, which was intended to be an artistic representation of the posture of an ancient Greek goddess’ statue or some such thing. It first came into fashion in the late 1860s with surge of Neo-Classicism in the art world, then it went out of style, then came back in at the end of the century. The extreme curve of the back was emphasized with fashionable “S-bend” corsets, the puffy bodice front, and hip pads, which made the bust and backside more prominent. Thank goodness that posture isn’t the fashion today (although modern slouching is probably just as bad for the back)!

  2. How interesting! Both the info on the photographers and the posing.

    It looks as if the photo has been touched up at the woman’s back.

  3. Is she an ancestor of Robert Carlyle, actor extraordinaire?


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