PRETTY WOMAN AND A BUCKET: IT MUST BE LAUNDRY DAY (VINTAGE REAL PHOTO POSTCARD)

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A pretty young woman squats down and leans over a bucket as she does her wash. Is she washing her laundry or is she performing some other household task? What do you think? She appears very focused on her work and is wearing an apron to protect her clothing from soiling. The woman and the location that this photograph was taken are unidentified. This vintage real photo postcard is an interesting and unusual image.

 

Published in: on November 30, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Comments (2)  
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BEAUTIFUL PORTRAIT OF A MENNONITE MOTHER AND DAUGHTER (VINTAGE REAL PHOTO POSTCARD)

 

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This vintage real photo postcard features an image that encourages conjecture. Therefore, I will conjecture. I believe that the photograph presents a mother and daughter (they display a family resemblance)  posing outside their front door just past their wood porch. Mom is sitting on a chair and her daughter affectionately rests her right hand on her mother’s shoulder. Note that the daughter is standing on and the mother is sitting on a pretty rug. They apparently brought the rug from inside the house for the purpose of being used in the photograph. Judging by the pair’s clothing, I believe that they are Mennonites. The stamp box on the reverse of the postcard indicates that it is printed on AZO paper which was issued between 1904 and 1918.

Published in: on November 29, 2015 at 9:01 am  Comments (2)  
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PORTRAIT OF A WEDDING COUPLE IN CANELONES, URUGUAY

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This cabinet card features a wedding couple posing for their portrait at Bernardo Grolero’s Fotografia Oriental in Canelones, Uruguay. The groom is dressed in the gaucho style. Gauchos were cowboys of the South American Pampas. The city of Canelones is the capital of the Canelones department and is located about 31 miles north of Montevideo. The city was named after a species of cinnamon which is called “canelon”. To view other photographs from Uruguay, click on the category “Uruguay”.

 

Published in: on November 27, 2015 at 7:04 pm  Leave a Comment  
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TWO YOUNG WOMEN WITH BIG HATS (VINTAGE REAL PHOTO POSTCARD)

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This vintage real photo postcard provides a view of fashion sometime slightly after 1900. The ladies clearly dressed up for their visit to the photo gallery.  Note the women’s wonderful large hats. Be sure to take notice of the large pins extending from the hat on the right. This postcard is printed on AZO paper issued between 1904 and 1918.

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Published in: on November 25, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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ON THE ROAD WITH FRENCH ACTRESS GABRIELLE REJANE (VINTAGE REAL PHOTO POSTCARD)

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This vintage real photo postcard features French theatre actress Gabrielle Rejane standing on the sideboard of her chauffeur driven limousine. A little boy (most likely her son) peaks over her shoulder at the camera. The car in this photograph is beautiful, as was Rejane. A cabinet card image of the actress can be seen below. The photograph was taken by celebrated photographer Felix Nadar. Gabrielle Rejane was the stage name employed by Gabrielle-Charlotte Reju (1856-1920). She was born in Paris and had theatre in her blood as her father was an actor. She studied under Regnier at the Conservatoire and excelled in comedy. She made her debut in 1875 playing a number of “soubrette parts. Her first major success was in Meilhac’s “Ma Camarade (1883) and she quickly became known as a talented emotional actress. She played roles in “Decor”, “Ma Cousine”, and “Lysistrata”. In 1892 she married M. Paul Porel, the director of the Theatre du Vaudeville. The marriage lasted twelve years. In 1893 she appeared in Paris and soon thereafter she appeared in her most famous role as Catherine in Sardou’s “Madame Sans-Gene” in London and New York. In 1906 she opened the Theatre Rejane in Paris. She and Sarah Bernhardt served as the models for the character of the actress Berma in Marcel Proust’s novel “In Search of Lost Time”. Gabrielle Rejane’s acting is thought to represent what wikipedia describes as “the essence of French vivacity and animated expression”. Rejane appeared in a number of short films during the pioneering days of early cinema. Réjane died in Paris and is buried in the Cimetiere de Passy. Her obituary appeared in the New York Times (1920) and it was chock full of praise including; “She was the supreme comedienne of her time.” The image of Me. Rejane seen on this postcard was photographed by Paul Boyer (1861-1908) of Paris. He invented the use of magnesium for the flash in photography. He also was a very talented and award winning photographer. His studio was located at 35 Boulevard des Capucines in Paris. He produced many portraits of theater actors and actresses as well as other celebrities of his time. This postcard was published by Societe Industrielle de Photograpie (SIP) of Rueil, France and was part of a series (no. 2000).The postcard is addressed to Lyons, France and the writer of the message written on the card dated it 1908. This postcard is particularly special because it is a rare image of Gabrielle Rejane.

 

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Nadar,_Félix_-_Gabrielle_Réjane_(1856-1920)

 

 

 

 

 

TWO PORTRAITS OF MADGE WYLLIE: A BEAUTIFUL LITTLE GIRL IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

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The top vintage photographic portrait features an absolutely beautiful little girl with a charming smile. The second photo provides a closeup view of the child. She has long loose curls and a pretty matching dress and hat. An inscription on the reverse of the photograph identifies the young girl as Madge Wyllie and the date of the photograph as 1902.  It was very difficult to uncover information about Miss Wyllie until I stumbled across a wedding announcement in the Chicago Tribune (9/11/02) pertaining to her sister. It was reported that “Miss Madge Wyllie was flower girl and wore a gown of white point d’espirit over silk” at her sister Edith’s wedding. It is interesting to note that Madge was flower girl the same year she sat for this photograph. The article also reported that Madge’s father was H. D. Wyllie. Learning her father’s name opened genealogical doors wide enough to garner more helpful information. H. D. Wyllie was actually Hubert D. Wyllie who was an English born engineer living in Chicago with his wife and many children (at least seven). One of these children was Margery Rose Wyllie, otherwise known as Madge. Madge was born in 1890 so she was about twelve years old when she posed for this photograph. The 1910 census found her living with her family of origin in Chicago and unemployed. She married Walter Crossett Barber. She died in 1983 and is buried in Naperville Cemetery in Naperville, Illinois. This photograph was taken by the J. Edgar Waters studio in Chicago, Illinois. About a year after I originally posted this photograph, I came into possession of another Water’s photograph of this same young lady (see the third, fourth, and fifth image above). Amazingly enough, the two photographs found each other and are now exhibited together in the Cabinet Card Gallery. The newly found vintage photograph features an attractive young woman taking a bow for the camera. She is beautifully dressed and her hair is well coiffed. She is wearing two necklaces, a feather in her hair, and is holding an open fan. Note the handkerchief on the floor. She seems well poised and may be an actress. This photograph was taken by J. Edgar Waters at his studio in Chicago Illinois. Once again, the reverse of the image is inscribed with the name “Madge Wyllie” and dated “1902”. Madge is a brunette in one photograph and a blonde in the other photograph. I believe that she is wearing a blonde wig in the second image. It is interesting to note that she is wearing the same shoes in both photographs. Waters was an excellent photographer. To learn more about the photographer and to view more of his photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Waters”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published in: on November 23, 2015 at 5:51 am  Leave a Comment  
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FORMALLY DRESSED YOUNG MAN IN LINCOLN, ILLINOIS

kerrThis vintage photograph features a handsome young man photographed by E. N. Kerr who operated a photographic studio in  Lincoln, Illinois. The young man’s hair is well styled and he is dressed in fine clothing. Ernest N. Kerr (1866-1954) appears as a photographer in the Bloomington, Illinois business directory issue of 1893. From at least 1905 through 1913 he is included in the Rock Island business directory as a photographer. He and his wife, Carrie Clute Kerr are buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in El Paso, Illinois. kerr grave

 

 

 

Published in: on November 22, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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THREE YOUNG BOYS DRESSED IN HARLEQUIN COSTUMES IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

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The photographer of this wonderful vintage photograph is J. Edgar Waters who operated a studio in Chicago, Illinois. The three children seen in this image are wearing harlequin costumes. Harlequin was the best known of the comic servant characters from the “Italian Commedia dell’arte. The character was introduced in the late 16th century and represents a light heartedness and even devilish (trickster) nature. Overtime the character took on more of a romantic role. Photographer J. Edgar Waters wrote an article for a business magazine. “The Magazine of Business” (1915) contains an article entitled “The One-Man Business”. In the article, Waters provides practical advice about business record keeping. To learn more about this photographer and to view more of his photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Waters”.

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BRITISH STAGE ACTRESS CISSY GRAHAME PHOTOGRAPHED BY W and D DOWNEY IN LONDON, ENGLAND

CISSY GRAHAMEBritish stage actress, Cissy Grahame is the subject of this portrait by the famed London photographic studio W. & D. Downey. She looks quite beautiful in her lace scarf and feathered hat. Grahame was born in 1862. She was the daughter of an actress and she took her first stage role at the age of thirteen. Three years later she was  hired to the stage by Mr. Wilson Barrett and soon thereafter by the Kendal’s. As she progressed in her theatrical career she added theatre management to her repertoire. To view other photographs by the Downey studio, click on the category “Photographer: Downey”.

Published in: on November 21, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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THE DOWNSTAIRS HELP: PORTRAIT OF A MAID IN SOUTHPORT, ENGLAND

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Julius A. Kay is the photographer who took this portrait of a domestic worker in Southport, England. She is attractive and wearing a fine housekeepers uniform. It seems apparent that she worked for a wealthy family. Mr Kay’s name is cited in a number of professional photography journals of his time. In addition, his work is mentioned in a medical book, Practical Radiograph: A Handbook of the Application of the X-Rays” (1896). Mr. Kay helped radiograph a hand with a supernumerary thumb (extra bone structure) which surgeons of a local infirmary were able to use to see the exact bone formation of the area. They were able to employ the radiograph image to make a decision about the necessity of amputation.   ADDENDUM: A viewer of this image has expressed a strong opinion that the woman in this photograph is a nurse, and not a housekeeper.

Published in: on November 20, 2015 at 6:02 pm  Leave a Comment  
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