PORTRAIT OF A SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

lexington

This cabinet card photograph features a portrait of a southern gentleman. He is finely dressed and holding his hat in his hand. He is wearing a stylish beard and mustache. His facial expression communicates arrogance. The photography studio that produced this image is the Johns & Faught studio of Lexington, Kentucky. The cabinet card gallery has other photographs by this studio and they can be seen by clicking the category “Photographer: Johns & Faught” or by placing the studio’s name in the search box. If you view the other photographs you will note that this studio does an outstanding job with their portrait photography. In the book “History of Fayette County, Kentucky” (1882) it is stated that W. E. Johns was born in Lexington in 1843. He began his photography business in Lexington in 1870 and by 1876 opened a new studio at the address (56 East Main Street) where he photographed this cabinet card. By at least 1886, James Faught worked for Johns as an operator in his studio. At a later date, the pair became partners in the business.

lexington-1

Published in: on November 29, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
Tags: , , ,

TWO ADORABLE CHILDREN IN TRADITIONAL GERMAN COSTUMES IN HAMBURG

kindermann

This wonderful Carte de Visite features two adorable children wearing traditional clothing posing for their portrait at the Banque & Kindermann studio in Hamburg, Germany. The boys outfit has an abundance of buttons and he is wearing a top hat. The little girl is holding a basket of pretty flowers and is wearing a hat that resembles a “frying pan”. On each side of the children are potted plants. The image is actually a lovely photograph. The reverse of the photograph has print that advertises the fact that the studio won medals at an 1887 exhibition in Stuttgart, Germany. This photograph was likely taken shortly after that contest. “The Photographic Times” (1897) tells the story of photographer Conrad Kindermann. He was born in Lubeck, Germany in 1842. He apprenticed in a cloth house in Riza, Russia for five years and worked there another year. He then was introduced to working as a photographer by his brother who had a studio in Hamburg. In 1863 he opened a studio in Lubeck. The ceilings in this studio were so low that they prohibited photographing adults when they were standing. The resourceful Kindermann decided to specialize in photographing children. It is very interesting to note that the word “kinder” means “children”. He was truly a Kindermann. In 1869 he met photographer Herr Benque. They becamse fast friends and were soon partners in a studio in Hamburg. The studio encountered financial problems so Benque left and soon the studio became very successful and Kindermann became known as one of the best photographers of children in the country. A review of the era’s photography journals demonstrate that he was often cited or the subject of articles. Another fascinating fact is that Darwin used three of Kindermann’s photographs in his book “The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals” (1872).

kindermann-1

PORTRAIT OF A STRIKING WOMAN IN EUGENE, OREGON

striking-woman

The young woman in this post cabinet card era photograph is strikingly attractive. She has wonderful eyes. She appears to be a teenager. The striking young lady is wearing a high collared and ruffled dress as well as a necklace. The photograph was taken at the Winter Photo Company in Eugene, Oregon. The photographer, John A. Winter was born in Ohio sometime around 1831. He was active in the photography business in Eugene between 1864 and 1869, and again between 1873 and 1900. During his career he also operated photography businesses in Albany, Brownsville, and Jefferson; all towns in Oregon.In 1864 he advertised that he intended to “devote his whole time to making pictures”. In 1865 he began his career operating photographic studios. A number of times during his career he was plagued with poor health. At one point he owned a sheep ranch in addition to a photography studio. Winter employed the bartering system in his business. One of his ads promises to trade portrait taking for firewood. From 1888 to 1900, Winter was the photographer of Oregon State University. Winter’s son, Clarence L. Winter was a photographer in Eugene between 1891 and 1906. However, a letter from C. L. Winter appears in the Photographic Times (1887) indicating that he likely began working in Eugene earlier than the aforementioned date. It is not clear whether John A. Winter or Clarence L. Winter is the photographer who produced the picture of this lovely young woman. Perusing the Cabinet Card Gallery’s collection of photographs by Mr Winter, it is clear that he had photographic talent. This photograph measures about 4 1/4″ x 4 1/2″. To view other photographs by Winter, click on the category “Photographer: Winter”.

striking-woman-1

PORTRAIT OF LILY ELSIE: BEAUTIFUL AND TALENTED STAGE ACTRESS (VINTAGE RPPC)

ian 1

elsie-two

This vintage real photo postcard features celebrated stage actress Miss Lily Elsie (1886-1962). At the time of her portrait sitting for this image, Miss Elsie was also known as “Mrs. Ian Bullugh”. More about that later. Lily Elsie was a very popular English actress and singer. She was most known for her starring role in the London production of “The Merry Widow (1907)”. The show ran for 778 performances. A critic for The Pelican (1907) wrote that “the youthfulness, the dainty charm and grace, the prettiness and the exquisite dancing with which Miss Elsie invests the part…. I share the opinion of most of the first-nighters, who considered it could not have been in better hands, and could not have been better handled…. The night was a genuine triumph for Miss Elsie, and she well deserved all the calls she received”. She began as a child actress and before her big break had appeared in a number of Edwardian musical comedies. She was charming and beautiful and became one of the most photographed actresses of her time. Lily Elsie’s dad was a theater worker and her aunt was well known actress Ada Reeve. Shortly after the turn of the century she joined George Edwardes’ company at the Daly Theater. Some of her early appearances included “A Chinese Honeymoon”, “Lady Madcap”, “The Little Michus (1905)”. In the years between 1900 and 1906 she appeared in 14 shows. After the “Merry Widow” she appeared in  26 more shows including “The Dollar Princess” (1909) and “A Waltz Dream” (1911). She clearly was an actress who was in demand. Men paid her much attention but apparently she did not enjoy the attention. Lucile, her costume designer for “The Merry Widow” stated that Elsie was “absolutely indifferent to men and had once said that she disliked “the male character”. She added that men would only behave well if a woman “treated them coldly”. Now, some words about her marriage. In 1911 she he left the cast of a play in which she was performing to marry Major John Ian Bullough (1885–1936). Major Bullough was the son of a wealthy textile manufacturer. He was formerly married to actress Maude Darrell who only survived one year after their 1909 marriage. The marriage between Elsie and Bullough was reported to be very unhappy. Elsie’s health began to deteriorate and her husband pressured her to quit the stage and she was ready to do so. She returned to the stage during the war years (World War I) and was active in fund raising for the war effort. She next took a ten year break from the stage only to return once again. Her final performance took place in the Daly Theater in the play “The Truth Game” (1929). In addition to her theater career, Elsie made recordings, and appeared in two films, including D. W. Griffith’s “The Great Love” (1918). Also appearing in that film was Lillian Gish. In 1930 Elsie’s marriage ended in divorce. Her health began to deteriorate more and she developed hypochondriasis causing her to spend much time in nursing homes and sanitariums. Due to her psychological problems she had brain surgery. Her final years were spent at St. Andrews hospital in London. This postcard is part of a series (Arcadian no. A 26). The photographer of this image of this beautiful actress is the well known celebrity photographer, Rita Martin. She was considered one of the best British photographers of her time. She opened her studio in 1906. Martin’s sister, Lallie Charles was an esteemed society photographer. Many of Rita’s photographs can be found in the National Portrait Gallery. To view more photographs by Rita Martin in the cabinet card gallery, click on the category “Photographer: Martin”.

The second postcard of Miss Elsie provides a terrific close-up photograph of the beautiful Miss Elsie. She is wearing a dark jacket, a frilly high collared blouse and a ribbon bow tie. Her accessories include a long necklace, a pin low on her blouse, and a corsage. The postcard is part of the Rotary Photographic Series (no. 4159 J) published by Rotary Photo. The photograph was taken by the Foulsham & Banfield Studio. Foulsham & Banfield were well known celebrity photographers. Frank Foulsham and A. C. Banfield operated a studio in the 1900’s through the 1920’s.

                                              

                                                       Wedding Photo (1911)

ian 2

POSTCARD 1

elsie-two-1

POSTCARD 2

 

                

PORTRAIT OF A NEWSBOY

newsboy

This cabinet card portrait features a young newsboy holding a stack of newspapers. Soon after the photograph was taken, he was probably delivering the newspapers or hawking them on the street. The young entrepreneur is displaying a serious business like expression. He is wearing an outer jacket, knee pants, long black stockings, and lace boots. Note his flat cap. The photographer’s name and location are unknown.

Published in: on November 24, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: ,

AN ADORABLE BABY AND HER DOLL

girl-and-doll

This vintage real photo postcard features a lovely image of an adorable little girl holding a beautiful doll. The child is wearing a lacy dress, a necklace, and a pink ribbon in her hair. She is so photogenic. This postcard was sent by a woman named Suzanne to her younger brother living in Argentan, France. The postmark dates back to 1906. Suzanne wrote her name on the top right hand corner of the front of the postcard. She wrote it in red which is the same color ink she used to write her message on the reverse. The postcard was published by Germany’s Neue Photographische Gesellschaft (NPG) (New Photographical Society). The company was in business between 1894 and 1948. It was founded by Arthur Black (1862-1943) and it became of the most well known and largest companies involved in the production of postcards. Over time, NPG opened subsidiaries in London, Paris, Rome, and New York. Interestingly, the company was one of the “Best Companies to Work For”. Employees were given free medical treatment and illness benefits. Employees also received bonuses and life insurance. The company offered it’s employees a library, a casino, and a dining room which sold food for cost. In addition, the company offered it’s workers a reading room and a theater for lectures and theatrical performances. Now we know where Google and other employee friendly companies got some of their ideas from. Printing on the reverse of this postcard mentions that this postcard is an “Oranotypie” and also lists the name “A. G. Steglitz”. An oranotype is a trade name for a type of glossy real photo postcard published by NPG at the beginning of the 20th century. These cards are hand colored. I am unsure if Steglitz was a postcard publisher or a photographer. I have seen postcard aficionados refer to him as both a photographer and a publisher. My guess is that most of these “experts” are as unsure as I am about his role in producing postcards. 

girl-and-doll-2

A FATHER AND HIS YOUNG SON OUT FOR A BICYCLE RIDE

bike

This vintage real photo postcard features a father and his young son outside for a bicyclc ride. The pair are posed in front of a large tree. Father is well dressed and wearing a cap. The little boy is also well dressed and he is wearing a straw hat. The postcard appears to be of French origin and is a rare find.

bike-2

Published in: on November 23, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags:

MISS JOSE COLLINS: BEAUTIFUL STAGE AND FILM STAR (VINTAGE REAL PHOTO POSTCARDS)

jose-collins

collins

The pretty woman featured in this vintage real photo postcard is Miss Jose Collins (1887-1958). The name “Jose” was a shortening of her given name “Josephine”. She was an English actress and singer known for her appearances in musical comedies and early movies. She was born in London. Her mother was a music hall performer and comedian named Lottie Collins. Interestingly, she was the singer who popularized the song “Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay”. Jose Collins father was Stephen Patrick Cooney, her mother’s music coach. Collins began as a child actress and as a teenager had already appeared in both pantomine and music hall performances as a singer and actress. Her debut performance in the West End was a major role in “The Antelope” (1908). She also appeared on Broadway  in the production of “Vera Violetta (1911), “The Merry Countess (1912), “The Whirl of Society” (1912), and other shows. In the later production, she sang a duet with Al Jolson. She also appeared in the Ziegfeld Follies (1913). In 1917 she appeared in the hit musical “The Maid of the Mountains”, a role for which she received much acclaim. She actually earned a nickname from the show; she was known as “The Maid of the Mountains”. She appeared in a number of shows through 1925. One of these productions was “A Southern Maid”  (at Daly’s Theatre) and this postcard portrait captures her in that role. The show was an operetta and her costar was Bertram Wallis. The production ran for 306 performances. The remainder of her career was spent acting in revues, variety and non-musical roles. She also appeared in films. The IMDB reports that she appeared in thirteen movies between 1915 and 1933. Miss Collins was married three times and these unions produced no children. The link below will take you to a Ziegfeld Follies performance by Jose Collins. She is singing “Just You and I and the Moon” (1913). This postcard was published by J. Beagles & Co. of London, England. The postcard is part of a series (no. 222 U). The photograph of Miss Collins is by Reville Studios.

The second vintage real photo postcard presents Miss Collins in a relatively short frilly dress. She looks very pretty as she flashes a nice smile. The postcard was produced by Rotary Photo and is part of the Rotary Photographic Series (no. 4004 D)

 

 

jose-collins-1                                                                                                                 POSTCARD 1

collins-2                                                                                                                                                                                                        POSTCARD 2

CUTE LITTLE SAILOR BOY AND HIS BABY SIBLING IN A WAGON

bieber-2

This vintage post cabinet card era photograph is charming. A little boy in a sailor suit stands beside his baby sibling who is sitting in a wagon. The baby is wearing a gown and bonnet. Big brother is holding the handle of the wagon. Note the large back wheels on the wagon. The wheels are metal, not the rubber wheels that came later in time. The photographer and the location of the photo studio are unknown. The photo measures about 4 1/2″ x 6 1/4″ and the mat may have been trimmed.

Published in: on November 21, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags:

A GENTLEMAN WITH “MUTTON CHOPS” IN HAMBURG, GERMANY (PHOTO BY EMILIE BIEBER)

bieber

This carte de visite photograph is by celebrated photographer Emilie Bieber. She was a very successful and talented female photographer. Female photographers were uncommon in the cdv era. Bieber is definitely one of my favorite photographers. You may view additional photographs by Miss Bieber by typing her name in the cabinet card gallery’s search box. Bieber had two locations in Germany; Berlin and Hamburg. She ran her Hamburg studio from 1852 through 1872 when she was joined by her nephew, Leonard Berlin-Bieber. Emilie Bieber died in 1884. This cdv portrait features a well dressed gentleman with wonderful mutton chops. He is not wearing an accompanying mustache. Printing on the reverse of the carte de visite brags about the medals won by this studio. Awards were earned from exhibitions in Berlin (1865), Hamburg (1868), Paris (1870), Vienna (1873), as well as other photography competitions. This record of photographic honors informs us that this cdv was produced in 1873 or shortly afterward.

bieber-1