A PORTRAIT OF A BOY AND A CHAIR BY MISS LIBBY IN NORWAY, MAINE (NOTED FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)

MISS LIBBY_0007A young boy dressed in a double breasted jacket and wearing a tie poses for this portrait by Miss Libby of Norway, Maine.  Minnie Libby (1863-1947) had a sixty year business career in Norway, Maine. She was a very able photographer and also an eccentric. She was the daughter of a Maine born blacksmith who was also a carriage maker and dealer. The 1880 census lists her at age sixteen as being an artist. She was sent to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and developed an interest in photography. She worked as a studio photo retoucher while living in Boston. In 1882 she worked as a photo retoucher at the Anthony Crockett Picture Studio in Norway. In 1885 her father constructed a building to house her first studio. By the 1890’s Miss Libby was quite successful. In 1905 her father helped her buy a new studio which caused some controversy in the town of  Norway. The seller of the building neglected to tell his tenant, a photographer, that the building was sold. The tenant photographer took ads out in the local paper denouncing the underhanded business practices of Miss Libby who ultimately occupied the building. Miss Libby’s response to the ads was to take out her own ads in which she said that she would use the advertising space to talk about her business, and not to make misleading statements about her competitors. In 1940, Life Magazine discovered Miss Libby. They did a feature on her life as a photographer, both past and present. Minnie Libby also produced oil paintings while working as a photographer. She was a talented artist and did many paintings of plants and flowers as well as landscapes. The Life Magazine article describes Miss Libby’s appearance. She most often wore knickers, men’s shirts, and a flowing bow tie. She was also described as a “first class photographer”. To view other photographs by Miss Libby, click on the category “Photographer: Libby”.

PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN IN GARDINER, MAINE (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)

 

FEMALE PHOTOG_0002This cabinet card features a bust portrait of a young woman. This is likely an early image from the cabinet card era. The photographer of this image is “Mrs. Barker” of Gardiner, Maine. Research found very little information about this pioneer female photographer. The 1880 United Startes census reveals that Julia R. Barker lived in Gardiner, Maine and worked as a photographer. Her husband, Eugene Barker, was employed as a railroad engineer. Both were 35 years old at the time of the census.

Published in: on December 12, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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PORTRAIT OF CHARLOTTE CASTERLINE IN BATAVIA, NEW YORK (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER, 1898)

The subject of this portrait is Charlotte Casterline of Hammondsport, New York. Her name is pencil written on the reverse of the photograph along with the initials “G. S. N. S.”. The image is dated “1898”. The photographer of this portrait is Ada Houseknecht of Batavia, New York. Research found a cabinet card photographed by Houseknecht Brothers studio located at 106 Main Street in Batavia. The studio was active from 1880 until 1949. A separate investigation revealed that Batavia was the home of a studio operated by Beecher (1858-1930) and Ada Houseknecht (1871-?). Beecher went to work for photographer William Wilson in 1880 and bought out the studio. Ada started as a photo retoucher but became a full time photographer with her husband, Beecher. She was one of the first female professional photographers in the state of New York. She took over the studio when Beecher died in 1930. Little could be discovered about Charlotte Casterline. The 1899 Annual Report of the Superintendent (New York) notes that Charlotte graduated from the Normal School in Geneseo, New York. She was 0ne of the few students in the school who majored in science. After completing some research about Miss Casterline, it seems likely that this photograph was taken at her graduation from the Geneseo State Normal School (G. S. N. S. ?).

PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG WOMAN IN DETROIT, MICHIGAN (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)

A young woman poses for the camera at the studio of Arthur & Philbric in Detroit, Michigan. She is wearing an unusually loud patterned blouse. Note the subjects fingerless gloves and collar pin. The Arthur & Philbric Studio had galleries in Detroit and Grand Rapids, Michigan, as well as in Toledo, Ohio. Research revealed some information about James Arthur (1855-1912). He was a native of Montreal, Canada and first began work as a photographer with the well known  J. and J. W. Notman studio. He came to Detroit in 1881 and went to work with photographer J. E. Watson. In 1883 he became senior partner in the firm of Arthur & Philbric and they remained in business together for eight years. He then became sole proprietor of a firm called Arthur Studios. Research also yielded information about Philbric. Most notable is that Philbric was a woman. Her name was Helen M. Philbric and her name appears in Michigan business directories as Arthur’s partner between 1884 and 1893. No other information about Philbric was discovered. To view the work of other female photographers, click on the category “Female Photographers”.

ATTRACTIVE AND FASHIONABLE COUPLE IN LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER WITH PHOTOGRAPHIC GENES)

An attractive and fashionable couple stand in front of the camera in this portrait by Duclos. The gallery was located in Lowell, Massachusetts. The couple in this photograph are very well dressed and likely affluent. The couple are unidentified. This is a lovely image but there was an error made in setting up the couple’s pose. Take a close look and see if you can find the photographer’s mistake. I will describe the error in the second-to-last sentence of this paragraph. There is only sketchy information about the photographer of this image. However, the information is pretty amazing. An article in the Nashua Telegraph (1909) is entitled “DUCLOS FAMILY OF PHOTOGRAPHERS: THREE GENERATIONS OF PICTURE TAKERS”. The story reveals that the family of Mr and Mrs Alphonse Duclos of Lowell,was a family of photographers. Both father and mother were photographers and each of their six children “have charge” of photography studios. Each of the married children were married to photographers and the one and only grandchild (age 12) was considered a prodigy photographer. The article reports where each of the members of the Duclos family worked as photographers. Sadie Duclos is the family member who operated studios (2) in Lowell. When setting up the pose and while photographing this image, Sadie did not notice one of the woman’s shoes sticking out from under her dress. To view the work of other female photographers, click on the category “Female Photographers”.

Published in: on August 8, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (3)  
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MAN WITH A GREAT BEARD IN LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY

This cabinet card is a portrait of a middle aged man with a wonderful mustache and beard. The Cabinet Card Gallery has a collection of interesting facial hair cabinet cards which can be visited by clicking on the categories of “Beards (Only the Best)”  and “Mustaches (Only the Best)”. The photographer of this image is Louis Bergman, whose studio was located at 56 & 58 Market Street, in Louisville, Kentucky. Perusal of Louisville business directories reveals that Bergman began business with a partner. Bergman & Flexner; the firm was listed in the 1868 and 1869 directories. He was reported to be the sole proprietor of a studio from 1872 until 1886. Bergman was listed at a number of different addresses over these years. Using these addresses, it appears that this particular photograph was taken between 1873 and 1881. From 1886 through 1894 the proprietor of the studio became Caroline Bergman. The Photographic Times and American Photographer (1883) reported that Bergman was Vice President of the Photographers Mutual Benefit Society of Louisville. Louis Bergman (c1838-?) was born in Hanover, Germany to Prussian parents. His wife, Carrie (!845-?) was born in Louisiana to German parents. The couple married  in about 1865. The Bergman’s had a daughter, Lillie, who was 12 years-old at the time of the 1880 census. The census listed Louis as a photographer and Carrie as a homemaker. It is interesting to note that when the couples daughter reached 18 years of age, Carrie became the studio’s proprietor/photographer.

PRETTY YOUNG WOMAN PHOTOGRAPHED BY AIME DUPONT IN NEW YORK CITY

This cabinet card features an attractive young woman posed holding a book. The woman is nicely dressed and has a lovely figure. Her great figure is, no doubt, assisted by her tight corset. The book she is holding is entitled “Grifting“. The definition of grifting is “engaging in petty swindling”. What is a nice girl like the girl in this image doing with such a sensational book? The most likely reason she has possession of that particular title is that; it was there in the studio. The book likely belonged to the photographer. The studio that produced this photograph was the Aime Dupont gallery. Dupont (1842-1900) founded his photography business in 1886 in New York City, New York. He was formerly a sculptor and he was of Belgian origin. His American wife, Etta Greer, was also a photographer. She was well respected for he work as a portraitist of opera singers in Paris, France. She was educated in Paris and spent much of her childhood there. She also met and married Dupont in Paris. The couple was very talented and they became very popular as portrait photographers in New York. Among their society and celebrity clients were many singers who were appearing in New York. After Dupont’s death, his wife, and later his son (Albert), operated the studio. His wife kept the name of the studio the same, after the death of her husband. In 1906, the Metropolitan Opera hired its own official  photographer, resulting in diminished portrait work in that sector. The studio went bankrupt in 1920.  A couple of interesting questions about this photograph remain unanswered. Is the subject of this photograph someone famous in society or the performing arts? Who was the photographer, was it Aimee Dupont, or his wife, Etta?

ADORABLE TWIN GIRLS AND THEIR LITTLE SISTER (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)……….AKA “LOVELESS IN CARLINVILLE”

This family portrait features adorable identical twin sisters and their younger sibling. The three children share the same face and hairstyle. Like many twins of today, these twins are dressed identically. The twins are holding hands and are standing in front of their sibling who is posed in a prominent position, centered and standing on a chair peering over her sisters shoulders. The photographer who created this photograph was Miss Trumbull of Carlinville, Illinois. The precious children in this photograph are identified on the reverse of the image. Their names are, from left to right, Lila, Georgia, and Lela Loveless. The U.S. census of 1920 sheds some light on the Loveless family. First of all, the family was far from loveless, considering that Cyness and Sarah Loveless had five children. The twins, Lila and Lela, and their little sister, Georgia, had an older brother named Lincoln and a younger brother (Mack) and younger sister (Sadie). It is interesting to note that the Loveless parents named a son Lincoln. The boy was born in 1896, and that despite the fact that three decades had passed since the civil war, the Loveless’s honored their native son assassinated President. After considering the census data, it is likely that this photograph was taken approximately 1904. By 1920, Lincoln Loveless, age 24, had joined his father working as a farmer. Unfortunately, research has not yet uncovered any information about the photographer of this image. Women photographers during this era were not common. Hopefully, a visitor to the Cabinet Card Gallery will be able to supply biographical information concerning Miss Trumbull.

Published in: on December 23, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (3)  
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JULIA BLAESS KLAGER: MICHIGAN BICYCLIST (PHOTOGRAPHED BY FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)

An inscription on the reverse of this cabinet card, indicates that the young woman posed with the bicycle, is Julia Blaess Klager. Note the bell on the handlebars of the bike. Julia is beautifully dressed for her portrait at the studio of Susan  T. Cook. Cook had galleries in both Ann Arbor and Dundee, Michigan. She is listed in an 1890 Ann Arbor directory. An attempt to find biographical information about Julia Klager, produced uncertain results. The 1920 US census lists a Julia Klager, residing in Washtenaw, Michigan. Her date of birth was listed as 1877, which could be a match for the woman in this cabinet card. A Julia Klager was also found to be associated with the University of Michigan. A woman with that name received a music degree (piano teacher) in 1907 and is also listed as a music patroness in the 1908 University of Michigan Yearbook.  This musically inclined woman, may, or may not be, the woman in this photograph.

Published in: on September 25, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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