TWO PORTRAITS OF GERMAN ACTRESS VILMA VON MAYBURG (ONE PHOTO BY E. BIEBER)

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Postcard 1

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veiled actress 5                                                                        close up of postcard 2

A costumed Vilma Von Mayburg poses for her portrait in the top vintage real photo postcard. The beautiful German stage and silent film actress is known for “Die Erbin des Grafen von Monte Christo (1919)”, Der siebente kub (1918)”, and  “Menschen in Ketten (1919)”. Her film career began in 1916.  This postcard was published by “EPA” which is the Albert Phototype Establishment. The company was located in Algers, Algeria.              The second photo postcard shows a standing Miss Mayburg. She is quite pretty and well dressed. She is adorned with flowers and holding a fan. After I purchased this photograph, I had a nice surprise. I realized that the photograph was taken by one of my favorite photographers, Emilie Bieber. She was quite successful and quite talented. Bieber had two studios in Germany; Berlin and Hamburg. The Hamburg studio operated from 1852 through 1872 when she was joined by her nephew, Leonard Berlin-Bieber, Emilie Bieber died in 1884. .

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THREE MEN WEARING BRIMMED HATS IN WAUSA, NEBRASKA

This cabinet card portrait features three men wearing western style fancy clothing. Note their brimmed hats. One wonders if it was a special  occasion that brought these three well dressed men to a photography studio. This image was produced at the Teilborg studio in Wausa, Nebraska. The town’s name “Wausa” begs for an investigation regarding the name’s origin. The town was started in 1882 and was originally named Thorson. A number of Swedish immigrants settled there and in 1885, the town’s name was changed to “Vasa” in honor of the Swedish king (Gustaf Vasa). When the railroad arrived in 1890, the town’s name was changed once again. The town became known as “Wausa”, a combination of the King’s name and the letters “U.S.A”. Preliminary research found no information about this image’s photographer (Teilborg).

Published in: on October 7, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN WEARING AN UNUSUAL HAT

This vintage real photo postcard features a woman wearing an unusual hat. I am thinking that the millinery designer of this hat designed it in the fog of a bad hangover, or perhaps the woman in the photograph wore the hat into the woods and exited with a branch stuck through her hat. In addition, the branch appears to be hosting one leaf and a caterpillar tent. The subject of this photograph is wearing a winter coat and a nice pursed smile. The AZO stamp box on the reverse of the postcard indicates that it was produced sometime between 1904 and 1918.  The identity of the hatted woman and the studio that took the photograph are unknown.

Published in: on September 12, 2017 at 12:35 pm  Comments (5)  
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PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY YOUNG WOMAN IN PASSAIC, NEW JERSEY

A pretty young woman sits on a bench and has her photographic portrait taken at the New York Studio in Passaic, New Jersey. She is wearing a watch, ring, and some type of fur animal. This vintage real photo postcard was produced by Defender.

Published in: on August 31, 2017 at 4:44 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY YOUNG GIRL IN COATESVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA (THE GREAT MEMORIAL CARD DEBATE)

This cabinet card portrait features a relatively close-up view of a pretty girl dressed in dark clothing. She appears to be in her late adolescence. Her photograph is presented as if it is on a scroll. I have come across much debate as to whether the “scroll images” are memorial photographs. After reading both sides arguments, I tend to believe that they are not necessarily memorial photographs. The teen seen in this photograph is wearing a hat that reminds me of an old adage, “A bird on the hat is worth two in the bush”. Perhaps I may be confused about that proverb but the young lady seen in this cabinet card is wearing a “bird hat”. This style hat is not one of my favorite examples of millinery design. At the turn of the 19th century it became the style in the US and Europe to wear feathers and even whole taxidermied birds on their hats. This resulted in the killing of millions of birds all around the world. An article in “Sociological Images” (2014) reports on a single order of feathers by a London dealer in 1892 requiring the “harvesting” of 6,000 Birds of Paradise, 40,000 Hummingbirds, and 360,00 of various East Indian birds. Ornithologists started to speak out in resistance to this practice. One asserted that 67 types of birds were at risk for extinction. Ornithologists and their supporters began to target women who were supporting the practice of slaughtering birds. Women were receiving the blame for the barbarism being committed against birds. The writer, Virginia Woolf (1882-1942) reminded readers that it was men who were actually murdering the birds and making a profit from them. Interestingly, middle class women were major advocates in the bird preservation movement. In the US the movement sparked the development of the first Audubon societies. The Massachusetts Audubon Society organized a feather boycott, and soon the US government passed  conservation legislation that protected the birds. The photographer of this cabinet card is J. B. Gibson who operated a studio in Coatesville, Pennsylvania. John Banks Gibson is reported to have been a photographer from the 1870’s until the 1890’s. He initially worked producing ferreotypes (tintypes). In 1893 he sold his business to photographer Robert Young. Gibson was born in East Nottingham, Pennsylvania and died in 1913 in Coatesville at 75 years of age. He learned photography as a young man from Alexander McCormick of Oxford, Pennsylvania.

Published in: on August 15, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (2)  
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CHARMING YOUNG WOMAN AT AN OPEN GATE IN JAMESTOWN, NEW YORK

A charming and pretty young woman stands at an open gate as she poses for this cabinet card portrait. The woman is beautifully dressed and well adorned with bracelets, a feathered hat, and a parasol. The photographer of this image is A. N. Camp of Jamestown, New York. He began his photography business there in 1885. To learn more about Mr. Camp, and to view more of his images, click on the Cabinet Card Gallery’s category “Photographer: Camp”.

Published in: on August 7, 2017 at 12:13 pm  Leave a Comment  
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ETHEL BARRYMORE: STAGE BEAUTY

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Ethel Barrymore (1879-1959) was an outstanding American actress and a member of the famous theatrical Barrymore family. She was born Ethel Mae Blythe in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her parents were actors and she was the sister of John and Lionel Barrymore.  She was the great aunt of modern day actress Drew Barrymore.

Ethel Barrymore was considered by many to be the greatest actress of her generation. She was a major Broadway performer and first appeared there in 1895. She had roles in A Dolls House by Ibsen (1905).  She was a strong supporter of the Actors’ Equity Association and played a major role in the 1919 strike. She played in Somerset Maugham’s comedy, The Constant Wife (1926). She also starred in motion pictures beginning her film career in 1914.  Notable films included None but the Lonely Heart (1944) and The Spiral Staircase (1946). Around 1900, Winston Churchill proposed marriage to Barrymore but she refused. She later married Russell Griswold Colt in 1909 and had three children. She died of cardiovascular disease in 1959 at her home in California. The Ethel Barrymore Theatre in New York City is named in her honor.

The top cabinet card portrait of Ethel Barrymore was photographed by Phillips Photographers of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. To view other photographs by Phillips, click on the category “Photographer: Phillips”. The second cabinet card image of the actress was produced by Sarony, the famous celebrity photographer who’s studio was located in New York City. To see other Sarony photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Sarony”.

The third portrait of Miss Barrymore appears on a postcard published by the Rotograph Company who operated in  New York City and Germany. This postcard portrait was taken by famed Chicago photographer William Morrison. He is well known for his excellent portraits of theatrical stars. He produced both real photo postcards and cabinet cards. This postcard is number HB/1422 of the “Rotograph Series”. The image on this postcard is color tinted. This postcard has been mailed and postmarked (1907). The reverse of this postcard can be seen below.To view other photographs by Morrison, click on the category “Photographer: Morrison”.

The fourth portrait of Ethel Barrymore is an uncommon one. The image provides a lovely profile view of this legendary actress. If you search for this exact postcard online, you likely won’t find it. This postcard was published by E. Frey & Company who operated in  New York City . Research reveals that postcards displaying the printed name of  “E. Frey” were actually published by the Souvenir Post Card Company which existed between 1905 and 1914. It was located at 268 Canal Street in New York City. The company was purchased by Valentine & Sons and the combined company became Valentine – Souvenir. This postcard was printed in Germany and is in good condition (see scan).

The fifth photograph of Miss Barrymore was published by the Rotograph Company. This postcard portrait was taken by famed Chicago celebrity photographer William Morrison.This postcard is number B 662 of the “Rotograph Series”. The image has excellent clarity.

The sixth image is a vintage real photo postcard portrait of Ethel Barrymore. The postcard was published by Albert Hahn who was based in New York City (200 Broadway) and Hamburg. Hahn operated his company between 1901 and 1919. The postcard was produced in Germany sometime in the decade of 1900-1910. The postcard is part of a series (no. 5271),

                                                                                                                                 brrymore 1

                                            REVERSE OF THIRD IMAGE (ROTOGRAPH POSTCARD)

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                                             REVERSE OF FIFTH IMAGE (ROTOGRAPH POSTCARD)

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                              REVERSE OF THE SIXTH IMAGE (POSTCARD BY ALBERT HAHN)

A NERVOUS YOUNG MAN AND HIS BICYCLE

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This vintage real photo postcard features a young man standing beside his bicycle. The look on his face can be described as similar to a “deer in the headlights”. One could also describe his expression as nervous. It is as if he just got caught doing something wrong. Maybe it has something to do with the cigarette that he is holding in his right hand, though I doubt it. He is wearing a great outfit and cap but I would surmise that his boots don’t make pedaling a bicycle particularly easy. Note that the backdrop in this studio photo is quite pretty and detailed despite that it is obviously fake. This postcard was produced in the very early 1900’s.

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Published in: on January 3, 2017 at 5:52 pm  Comments (2)  
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A YOUNG BOY WEARING A STRAW HAT

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This CDV (Carte de Visite) features a well dressed young boy wearing a straw hat. The photographer is unknown as only his initials appear on the reverse of the photograph. Also on the reverse of the photograph is an inscription. I believe that the inscription is written in German.

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Published in: on December 12, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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WONDERFUL PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY WOMAN AND HER DOG IN MERIDEN, CONNECTICUT

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As a collector of vintage photographs, once in a while I encounter a very special photograph. This image falls into the category of “special”. The photographer did an excellent job of capturing this well dressed elegant woman and her pet dog (border collie?). The woman and dog are well posed and their expressions are fabulous. The talented photographer who produced this image is H. G. Borgfeldt and his studio was located in Meriden, Connecticut. A light inscription on the reverse of this photograph indicates that the woman in the photo is Lina B. Letacher Bartlett and the dog’s name is Zemke. Preliminary research reveals that Lina Bartlett (age 24) appears in the 1900 US census. She lived in Meriden with her husband George A. Bartlett (age 36) and her father-in-law. The pair had married in 1892. Her husband was a farmer. Lina also appeared in the 1910 US census but her demographics had changed significantly. She still lived in Meriden but she had become head of her household after getting divorced. Her occupation was listed as “farmer”. She lived with two young men. At least one of them was her cousin. It was also found that Lina was born in Germany in 1876 and arrived in the United States in 1878. The talented photographer of this image is Henry G. Borgfeldt. Meriden business directories indicated that he ran a photography studio there at least between the years of 1902 and 1909.

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Published in: on November 2, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Comments (2)  
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