A FAMILY OF FIVE IN MOURNING GATHER AROUND A POST MORTEM PHOTO OF BABY CARRIE

This cabinet card portrait is both interesting and sad. The photograph shows a family of five in mourning. They are dressed in dark clothing and on the table that they are sitting or standing by, is a cabinet card post-mortem photograph of a baby. On the reverse of this cabinet card is the inscription “Carrie Picture”. Clearly, someone has identified the baby as being named “Carrie”. This photograph was taken at the Bannister studio in St. Johns, Michigan. The Michigan Directory of Photographers reports that he operated his St Johns studio in 1895. The directory provides no first name for Mr. Bannister. It is my hypothesis that the photographer of the cabinet card portrait was Frank T. Bannister. He is listed as a photographer in the 1885 business directory for Saginaw, Michigan. He also appears in the 1910 US census as a photographer residing in New Richmond, Wisconsin.

Published in: on July 20, 2017 at 7:39 pm  Comments (2)  
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SOLEMN YOUNG WOMAN IN MOURNING IN TOPEKA, KANSAS

A young woman, perhaps a teenager, poses for her portrait at the Daylight Studio in Topeka, Kansas. She appears quite solemn and is wearing a black dress with black satin sashes and bows. Perhaps she is in mourning. The young lady is wearing a collar pin and a ring. She is beautifully dressed and is pretty despite her apparent discomfort at being photographed.

Published in: on July 19, 2017 at 7:32 pm  Comments (3)  
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FASHIONABLE WOMAN IN BLACK BEADED DRESS IN URBANA, OHIO

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The lady is in black, possibly in mourning. She is wearing a pretty black lace heavily beaded dress. A hair ornament in her hair, a corsage on her dress, and fingerless gloves complete her ensemble. The woman wears a serious expression and has piercing eyes. The lighting in this portrait is well done and highlights the woman and her dress. The photographer of this interesting cabinet card image is F. G. Wilhelmi who operated a photography studio in Urbana, Ohio. Fred G Wilhelmi, like many of photographer colleagues, got around. He appears to have begun his photography career in Cumberland, Maryland (1871-1880). He then practiced his trade in Urbana (1885-1889) and Cleveland (1890- 1900 or later). The dates provided are approximate and come from two guides about early Ohio photographers.

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Published in: on January 2, 2017 at 12:15 pm  Comments (3)  
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POSSIBLE MEMORIAL PORTRAIT OF A MAN IN KEWAUNEE, WISCONSIN

tree design

This cabinet card is unusual in that the portrait of the subject (man) is placed over a drawing of a stark winter scene. It is likely that the gentleman’s portrait is framed in this manner because the cabinet card is meant to be a memorial or mourning photograph. I have never seen a cabinet card with this type of border design. The photographer of this image is the Mutzbauer studio in Kewaunee, Wisconsin. The Mutzbauer studio was located in Kewaunee between 1887 and 1896. It later operated in Milwaukee, and it appears to have closed in 1928. The studio was started by Joseph Mutzbauer (1856-1915). He had two children that went into his business, Joseph L. Mutzbauer (1884-1965) and Louise Mutzbauer Macosta (1880-?).

Published in: on March 26, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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A BEREAVED WOMAN IN THE WOODS IN McPHERSON, KANSAS (FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER)

MRS VREELAND_0004This cabinet card features a well dressed woman dressed in black and holding a handkerchief. The woman appears to be dressed in mourning clothes. On the reverse of the cabinet card is the following pre printed quotation “Secure the shadow ere the substance fades”. This quotation was commonly used in the photographic community in advertising to encourage people to photograph their deceased relatives to keep their memory alive. The next part of the “secure the shadow” quotation is “Let nature imitate what nature made”. It was not uncommon to photograph corpses in life-like poses or in caskets, deathbeds, or other household furniture during the cabinet card era. See cabinet card gallery category “Memorial Card”. This photograph seems to be more of a mourning card than a memorial card, though one can’t be certain. The photographer of this image is Mrs. Vreeland who operated the “leading gallery” in McPherson, Kansas. To view other photographs by female photographers click on the category “Female Photographers”. To view other photographs by Mrs. Vreeland, click on the category “Photographer: Vreeland”.

MOURNING IN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

This cabinet card photograph captures an older woman dressed in her mourning clothes. She has suffered a loss and is wearing black. The woman is also wearing earrings and a matching collar pin. The clarity of this image is notable. The photographic studio is Elite; located at No. 838 Market Street, San Francisco, California. The photographers are Jones & Lotz, who are listed on the reverse of the card. To view more of their photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Jones & Lotz”.

Published in: on September 3, 2010 at 3:46 pm  Comments (1)  
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MOURNING IN PORTLAND, MAINE

This Cabinet Card may be a mourning card; a photograph of a woman in grief over the loss of a loved one. Sadness permeates this cabinet card and the woman’s expression. The photographer is Joseph Harrison Lamson (1840-1901) of Portland, Maine. The photographer’s father was a maker of daguerrotypes and his mother was an artist. He began his career in photography in Bangor, Maine and then worked in Cuba, the West Indies, and South America. He made a fortune and then bought a studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He then moved to Maine and operated a photographic studio in Portland. He photographed the poets Longfellow and Whittier. When he died, his two sons took over the studio.

AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMAN IN MOURNING DRESS IN WASHINGTON D.C.

BLACK MOURNING_0003This Cabinet Card is a portrait of Mrs. Brena Fantleroy who resided on P Street in Washington D.C.  She appears to be wearing a mourning dress as well as a very serious expression. Note her veil, jewelry and small purse. The photographer is F. T. Castle of Washington D.C.

BEAUTIFUL WOMAN POSES IN HER MOURNING ATTIRE IN LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY

MOURNINGWOMAN_0005A beautiful woman poses for her portrait for a photographer in the studio of Klauber in Louisville, Kentucky. The woman’s name is J. T. Lane. She is wearing a black mourning dress with elaborate beading and ribbons. She is wearing an interesting black hat and black gloves. Ms Lane is holding a hankie and a book. The photograph comes from a collection of photographs which belonged to a Charleston, South Carolina family. The same collection featured a number of photographs of a woman named Effe May Blanchard who married prominent Charlestonian Julian Hazelhurst Walter. A portrait and description of the life of the attractive Ms  Blanchard-Walter can be found by clicking on the tag found below this entry. The relationship between J. T. Lane and Ms Blanchard-Walter is unknown. The photographer of this portrait, Edward Klauber was considered by many to be one of the best photographers of his time. He was a native of Bohemia who came to the United States at age eighteen. His large and elegant studio was compared to the studio of Matthew Brady in New York City. The studio was lavishly furnished. Stage personalities like Mary Anderson enjoyed having portraits done by Klauber when they were in Louisville performing at the Macauley theatre. Klauber’s studio closed in 1913 and he died in 1918.