THE HAPPIEST BOY IN PORTLAND, MAINE

The little boy featured in this carte de visite may be the happiest child in Portland, Maine. He has the most wonderful smile and even his eyes sparkle with joy. He is wearing a sailor suit, which was a popular style during the cdv and cabinet card era. This photograph was taken at the J. H. Lamson gallery in Portland, Maine. The Cabinet Card Gallery has other photographs by Mr. Lamson and they can be seen by clicking on the category “Photographer: Lamson”. Joseph Harrison Lamson (1840-1901) operated a studio in Portland, Maine. His father was a maker of daguerrotypes and his mother was an artist. He began his career in photography in Bangor, Maine and then worked in Cuba, the West Indies, and South America. He made a fortune and then bought a studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He then moved to Maine and and began his photographic studio in Portland. He photographed the poets Longfellow and Whittier. When he died, his two sons took over the studio.

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Published in: on February 16, 2018 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A LITTLE GIRL WITH AN INFECTIOUS SMILE IN PORTLAND, MAINE

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This cabinet card portrait features an adorable little girl with cradling her head in her hands. She is displaying a terrific smile that would easily light up a room. She has flowing light colored hair. The photograph comes from the studio of Joseph Harrison Lamson which was located in Portland, Maine. To learn more about him and to view more of his photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Lamson”.

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Published in: on November 14, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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MOURNING IN PORTLAND, MAINE

This Cabinet Card may be a mourning card; a photograph of a woman in grief over the loss of a loved one. Sadness permeates this cabinet card and the woman’s expression. The photographer is Joseph Harrison Lamson (1840-1901) of Portland, Maine. The photographer’s father was a maker of daguerrotypes and his mother was an artist. He began his career in photography in Bangor, Maine and then worked in Cuba, the West Indies, and South America. He made a fortune and then bought a studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He then moved to Maine and operated a photographic studio in Portland. He photographed the poets Longfellow and Whittier. When he died, his two sons took over the studio.