TWO PORTRAITS OF PRETTY EUROPEAN STAGE ACTRESS LIANE HAID (PHOTOS BY ALEXANDER BINDER)

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These vintage real photo postcards features European film star Liane Haid (1895-2000). In the top postcard she poses holding a tennis racket and wearing a hair band to keep her hair out of her eyes. She is quite beautiful but how can we interpret her facial expression. To me, it looks like she is rolling her eyes as if she is bothered by something. Who is Liane Haid? She was born in Vienna, Austria and received training in both dance and singing. She gained the nickname of “Sweet Viennese Girl”. Haid was a prima ballerina, dancer, singer and stage actress. She worked in Budapest and Vienna as a dancer. Her stage career was mostly in Berlin and Vienna. She became a popular pin-up star through the 1920’s and 1930’s. Her first movie role was in a World War I propaganda film. She was employed by UFA and appeared in a number of comedy films  alongside other movie stars including Willi Forst, Bruno Kastner, and Georg Alexander. UFA was a major German Film producer and distributor that operated between 1917 through the end of World War II. Liane Haid refused a number of Hollywood offers but in 1942, she escaped Nazi Germany and went to Switzerland according to Wikipedia, “because of the regime, because everything was bombed, and because all the good directors had left”. Soon thereafter she got married and retired from films. She was married three times. The IMDB web site states that she has 92 film credits from 1915 through 1953. Notable films include “Lady Hamilton” (1921), “Lucrezia Borgia” (1926), and “The Song is Ended” (1930). The photographer of this terrific image was Alexander Binder (1888-1929). He had the largest photo studio in Europe during the late 1920’s and the 1930’s. Many of his entertainment star portraits appear on Ross Verlag postards. It is thought that Binder was of Swiss origin. He was of the Jewish faith. He studied engineering but did not complete his studies. From 1908 to 1910 he studied photography at a school in Munich, Germany. After the completion of his photography studies, he went to Berlin and in 1913 opened his first photography studio. Before long, he became one of the premier photographers in Berlin.  He primarily focussed on fashion and celebrity photography. Since Berlin was the capital of the European film industry, Binder photographed all the stars of the European film industry including, Lilian Harvey, Conrad Veidt, and Lya De Putti. Many of his images were used in popular film portrait postcards. His photographs could be seen in postcards published by Ross Verlag and Photochemie. Binder died in 1929 but new photo cards bearing his signature continued to be published until 1937. It is thought that the real photographer of these new postcards was Hubs Floeter (1910-1974) who was employed at the studio as an operator. The studio continued to be owned by Binder’s widow, Mrs. Binder Alleman and their two daughters. The studio was managed by the Jewish Elisabeth Baroness Vonhedlis Stengel who was later deported to the Theresienstadt concentration camp. In 1938 the Nazi’s closed Binder’s studio and it was later taken over by an Aryan photographer, Karl Ludwig Haenchen . Haenchen continued to produce celebrity portraits for postcards. His publishers included Film-Foto-Verlag. After World War II the studio was taken over by the Hasse und Wiese company.                                                          The second vintage postcard portrait of Miss Haid was also the work of Alexander Binder. The actress looks beautiful in her art deco lace headdress. Her eyes can be described as spell binding. The postcard was published by Germany’s Ross Verlag and is part of a series (no. 544/4). Also credited for this photograph is “Micco Film”. Before working for Micco Film, Haid was employed by Kunstfilm. She was very successful working for the company but in 1920 she sued the company for physically exploiting her (placing her in dangerous situations) and for making her financially responsible for her own makeup and costuming. Haid’s husband, industrialist Fritz  von Haymerle, built her a studio (Micco-Film) in Vienna to further promote her career. 

haid-1                                        REVERSE OF TOP POSTCARD

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                                  REVERSE OF BOTTOM POSTARD

RARE VINTAGE POSTCARD ADVERTISING “HUNYADI JANOS” MINERAL WATER COMPANY

 

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This rare vintage real photo postcard features an advertisement for a Hungarian medicinal water company. The product is named “Hunyadi Janos” and it was produced by Andreas Saxlehner of Budapest, Hungary. On the reverse of the postcard is the advertising phrase “Le purgatif des Famiiles” which google translate reveals to mean “The family laxative”. Interestingly, the label on the bottle is more reminiscent of a wine label than a laxative label. The print on the reverse of the postcard is written in French, so the postcard was likely produced in France. Research reveals that Andreas Saxlehner (1815-1889) was the owner of Hunyadi Janos Mineral Water Company. The business was established in 1863. The brand was named after Hanyadi Janos (1407-1456) who was a fifteenth century Hungarian military hero. Janos was acclaimed for driving the Turks out of the Balkans and stopping a Turkish siege of Belgrade. Saxlehner’s company was very successful. His residence became the home of Budapest’s Post Office Museum. His portrait can be seen below.

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PORTRAIT OF AN ANGELIC HUNGARIAN LITTLE GIRL IN BUDAPEST (VINTAGE REAL PHOTO POSTCARD)

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This vintage real photo postcard features an angelic looking little girl posing for her portrait at the Kalmar Studio in Budapest, Hungary. This bright eyed little girl is a photogenic cutie pie.  The stamp box indicates that this postcard was published by K Ltd and that the photo was taken sometime between 1918 and 1936.

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Published in: on March 7, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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PRETTY AND VIVACIOUS YOUNG WOMAN WITH UNUSUAL HAIRSTYLE IN BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

This cabinet card features an attractive young woman with a great smile. She gives the appearance of someone very vivacious. She is beautifully dressed and her hair is very long and worn in a style that can best be described  as a “hair pile”. One wonders how much time it would take her to dry her hair after bathing. Were hair dryers available to this pretty long tressed lady? Most readers will  be surprised to learn that this portrait was likely taken after the invention of the hair dryer. Hair dryers were invented in 1890 by Alexandre Goldefroy. He drew his inspiration from vacuum cleaners. Goldefroy owned a hair salon in France; and his patrons sat under the hair dryer. Hand held hair dryers were invented in the 1920’s. The photographer of this image is Kozmata Ferencz (1846-1902), located in Budapest, Hungary. To view other photographs by Ferencz, a celebrated Hungarian photographer, click on the category “Photographer: Ferencz”.