A PROFILE PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY WOMAN IN KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI (PHOTOGRAPHED BY A CIVIL WAR PHOTOGRAPHER)

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This cabinet card photograph features a profile view of a pretty young woman. She is wearing a high collar blouse and jacket. The young lady’s hair is worn up in a sweep and she is wearing earrings. The photograph was produced by the Carpenter Photographic Rooms in Kansas City, Missouri. Marion S. Carpenter was a daguerreotypist in Dayton, Ohio in 1850. He than conducted his photography business in Cincinnati at the Palace Art Studio between 1857 and 1865. During the Civil War he was a staff photographer for the United States Government. He photographed Abraham Lincoln on three occasions. After the war he went to Kansas City, Missouri where he continued to operate a photography business. The Bulletin of Photography (1913) notes his passing at age 84 while living in Kansas City. The notification indicates that he was still actively involved in business in 1913, the year of his death.

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PROFILE PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY WOMAN IN DAYTON, OHIO

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This cabinet card portrait features a profile view of a pretty young woman. She is wearing a necklace, earrings, and a serious expression. Note her lace collar. The photograhic studio that produced this image is Appleton & Hollinger which operated out of Dayton, Ohio. The studio was located at the corner of 3rd and Jefferson. To learn more about Joseph M. Appleton and William Hollinger and to view more of their photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Appleton & Hollinger”.

“AMERICA FOREVER”: PATRIOTIC TEN YEAR OLD IN DAYTON, OHIO SUPPORTS AMERICAN SOLDIERS AND SAILORS DURING THE SPANISH AMERICAN WAR

SAILOR BOY_0006A ten year-old boy named Horace H. Justice Jr. poses proudly in a sailor suit at the studio of Anderson &  Hartshorn in Dayton, Ohio. Horace’s naval cap displays the name “Dewey” rather than the more typical ship name. Admiral George Dewey (1837-1917) was a US naval officer best known for his victory at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish American War. He came home to the United States and was received as a conquering war hero. Young Horace is clearly paying tribute to Admiral Dewey. The Spanish American War era was a time marked by a escalation of patriotism in the United States and this image provides an illustration of this nationalistic fervor. It is also possible that Horace’s father may have served with Admiral Dewey and that Horace Jr. is emulating Horace Sr.. Initial research found a  Horace J. Justice living in Dayton. The 1900 US census reveals that Justice was married to Mattie Justice 1885) and at the time of the census, they had a twelve year old son also named Horace.  Horace Justice Sr. is mentioned in many Dayton city directories from 1871 through 1909. He worked many years as a travelling salesman.  It could not be established that Horace Sr. was in the armed forces. It appears that Horace Jr was born in 1888 and died in 1948. Information was also found about the photographers. Photographer James Otto Hartshorn was a leading Dayton photographer. He was born in Ohio in 1869. A Dayton history book reveals that he was “deprived” of his parents when he was thirteen years-old and forced to live with various friends. He worked on a farm until he turned eighteen and and then moved to Dayton and for a short time worked in a cotton batting factory. In 1888 he became employed in a photography studio where he learned to become a very skilled photographer. In 1891 he married Ella M. Huesman of Dayton.  In 1894  Hartshorn partnered with Charles F. Anderson and opened up the studio that produced the portrait of  Horace Justice Jr..

EMMA LORAINE: STAGE ACTRESS POSES ON BROADWAY IN NEW YORK CITY

Emma Loraine appears to have been a minor stage star. The New York Times (1879) reported that Wallack’s Theatre production of “Our Girls” included Ms. Loraine in the cast. Also in the cast was Maurice Barrymore. The New York Times (1881) has a story about the Wallach company going on tour because their new theatre was under construction. The company was planning to perform “She Stoops to Conquer” and “The School for Scandal” while on tour. Performing as part of the touring company was Osmond Tearle, Rose Coghlan, and Emma Lorraine. The cabinet card gallery has images of both Tearle and Coghlan that can be viewed by typing each of their names in the search box. Their names must be searched separately. Both cabinet card portraits of Loraine were photographed by celebrity photographer, D. H. Anderson of New York City. To view other images by Anderson, click on the category “Photographer: Anderson (New York)”. An article in the Photographic Times and American Photographer (1883) describes Anderson’s studio at 785 Broadway in New York City. The location was formerly the studio operated by famed photographer, Mathew Brady. Anderson is considered a pioneer in early photography. He made his first pictures (daguerreotypes) in Paducah, Kentucky in 1855. He later worked in Cincinnati (Ohio), Dayton (Ohio), New Orleans (Louisiana), Louisville (Kentucky), and various other cities. He finally settled for awhile in Richmond, Virginia in 1865. In 1881, he sold his studio and moved to New York City. The previously cited article described a “composition group” portrait that Anderson was working on during the magazine writers visit to his studio. The photograph was described as measuring eleven feet by fourteen feet and picturing the 7th Regiment posing in their new armory. The image included over a thousand soldiers.

BABY SITTING PRETTY IN LUXURY CARRIAGE IN GERMANTOWN, OHIO

This cabinet card photograph captures baby sitting comfortably in a luxury baby carriage. There will be no discomfort from the sun for this cute baby; courtesy of the large umbrella built into this Rolls Royce of baby prams. The photographer is Tresize,of Germantown, Ohio. Research reveals that Ohio had a number of photographers named Tresize, and it is unknown which Tresize is responsible for this image? Dayton, Ohio was the home of The Tresize Brothers Studio as well as photographer S. P. Tresize.   Samuel P. Tresize was a photographer located in Logan, Ohio.  J.Q. A. Tresize was a photographer in Zanesville, Ohio and a partner in the Photography Studio named Jaquary and Tresize.  William C.Tresize was a photographer in McConnelsville, Ohio.  Suffice it to say, it is unknown which Tresize photographed this image. To see other photographs of baby carriages, click on this site’s category “Baby Carriages”.

Published in: on December 25, 2010 at 12:11 am  Leave a Comment  
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ADORABLE BABY WITH CURLS IN DAYTON, OHIO

Photographers William Hollinger and Joseph M. Appleton (1848-?) produced this Cabinet Card photograph of a very cute baby in Dayton, Ohio.  Both partners of the Appleton and Hollinger studio were photographers of note. Hollinger worked in Urbana in the mid 1870’s and in Dayton from 1883 until 1896. He partnered with Appleton in the 1880’s. In 1900 he was included in an article in Wilson’s Photographic magazine.  Appleton trained in Akron, Ohio in the 1860’s and later worked in Millersburg and Columbus.  In 1880 he moved to Dayton, first working with Hollinger and by 1887 he had his own studio and owned a company that manufactured photographic plates. Appleton’s work was exhibited at the Chicago Worlds Fair in 1893 and at the National Academy of Design in 1898. He was an officer in the Photographic Association of America and a founder of the Photographic Salon of Ohio. To view other photographs by Appleton & Hollinger, click on the category “Photographer: Appleton & Hollinger”.