PORTRAIT OF FIVE UNIFORMED POLICE OFFICERS IN SOMERSWORTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE

This vintage photograph features five uniformed police officers posing for their portrait in Somersworth, New Hampshire. These lawmen appear very serious judging by their expressions. Mustaches must have been in vogue considering that only one of the five men is without one. The photographer of this image was Burton Etter. He was born in 1863 in Nova Scotia, Canada. He became a naturalized US citizen in 1881. He married Helen M Mason in 1892. It was his second marriage. His first marriage (1885-1891) ended in divorce. In an 1886 business directory he is listed as an employee in a boot factory. At least by 1892 he was working as a photographer in Dover, New Hampshire. His name appears in Dover directories as a proprietor of a photography studio through 1909. After that time, he moved to San Francisco where he worked as a photographer at least until 1930. He was still alive at the time of the 1940 US census. Photographer guides indicate that Etter had other studios besides the ones in Dover and Somersworth. This is a terrific occupational/police photograph.

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Published in: on October 11, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY WOMAN IN DOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE

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A pretty and nicely dressed woman poses for her portrait at the Drew studio in Dover, New Hampshire. The subject of this image enjoys her jewelry as can be seen by her ring and the bracelets on both of her wrists. To learn more about A. P. Drew and to view more of his photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Drew”.

Published in: on February 19, 2014 at 12:17 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A NEW ENGLAND GENTLEMAN

VERMONT MAN_0001The identity of the gentleman pictured in this cabinet card portrait is Caleb Lysander. The previous owner of this image reported that it comes from an album that makes this positive identification. The subject has an interesting billy goat beard. To view other notable beards, click on the category “Beards (Only the Best)”. The cabinet card was produced by the Howe studio which was located in Brattleboro, Vermont. A Brattleboro history internet site includes a biography and obituary of Mr. Caleb Lysander Howe. The article states that upon his death, his daughter, Mrs Mary Howe-Lavin was informed via cable to Paris where she was performing as a singer. Howe was born in Dummerston, Vermont, in 1811. At age two, he moved with his parents to Dover, Vermont. His father worked as a farmer and had a second business providing transportation between Dover and Boston. Howe worked on the family farm until he was about sixteen when he went to learn a trade as a machinist. At age eighteen he moved to Brattleboro to work in a machine shop. While in the role of machinist, he worked as a watchmaker and producer of jewelry. He married Miss Cynthia Sherman who was from Dover. In 1838 he leased a farm in Dover. He became interested in photography in about 1846 and soon purchased a photography studio where he started out producing daguerreotypes. He then purchased a four wheel car for three hundred dollars and added traveling photographer to his job description. He did most of his work within his county. It is reported that he made a profit of between one hundred and two hundred dollars a month. He came to Brattleboro in 1856 and purchased a photography gallery. He became quite successful as a photographer. In 1880 his son, John C. Howe became associated with the business and the studio became known as  C. L. Howe & Son. The senior Mr. Howe was highly regarded throughout the county as a teacher of vocal music and as a tenor singer. He died in 1895. There is a possibility that this is a self portrait. In other words, Caleb Lysander Howe may be the subject and the photographer.  Research found an engraved portrait of Howe that looks similar to this cabinet card image. As a side note, research found a number of references to C. L. Howes prima donna daughter. The book “Picturesque Brattleboro: With Over Two Hundred Illustrations (1894) describes Mary Howe-Lavin as a “beautiful songstress” and states that “there is something indescribably fascinating in the singing and personal appearance of this charming woman”. References reveal that she performed in a number of major cities in Germany. Her second wedding was announced in the New York Times (1905).

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SMILING LITTLE GIRL HOLDS HER DOLL IN DOVER, ENGLAND

girl and doll dover_0012An adorable and sweet looking little girl poses with her beautiful doll in this portrait by W. H. Broad of the Townwall Studio in Dover, England. She is sitting near a careful arrangement of fern or some other plant leaves. The child’s expression could be described as “frozen in happiness”.

Published in: on January 31, 2013 at 12:01 am  Comments (4)  
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ANGELIC LITTLE GIRL IN ARTISTIC POSE IN DOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE

An angelic looking young girl dressed in white, poses in an artistic portrait at the Drew Studio in Dover, New Hampshire. The little girl does not appear very happy about the process of being photographed. She has corkscrew curls and is wearing hair ribbons. She is sitting cross legged in a white wicker chair. The photographer of this large format image is A. P. Drew. The Dover Enquirer (1896) has an article which mentions Alfred Palmer Drew. In 1896 a “deluge” and subsequent fire destroyed a business block and three bridges in Dover. The flooding sent the stores on the block down the Cocheco River. The photography studio Drew and Boomer was among the stores washed away. The Bulletin of Photography (1917) contains the obituary of A. P. Drew. He died at the age of 81. He had been born in Dover and had worked as a photographer there for more than 50 years. He retired in about 1914. During the civil war he had been a member of the Strafford Guards. The regiment was originally established in 1822 and a year later became part of the New Hampshire State Militia. In 1864 the Strafford Guards were mustered into service of the Union Army for a period of sixty days. They relieved a New Hampshire artillery unit that had been sent to the front. A. P. Drew served as a corporal.

PRETTY WOMAN IN ROCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE

Photographer I. A. Collins of Rochester, New Hampshie, produced this cabinet card portrait of a lovely woman. She is wearing a pretty dress and an abundance of jewelry. Note her bracelet, ring, pin and chains. Her dress has two very large buttons and hopefully one of the fashion experts who visit the Cabinet Card Gallery can explain the purpose of the buttons. It appears as if the buttons are held together by a clasp and serve to keep the skirt portion in position.Very little information could be uncovered about photographer I. Collins. He was listed in the Dover, New Hampshire business directory (1889 and 1891) as a photographer. The directories  report that the gallery was located on a street named Hanson.

PRETTY LITTLE GIRL DRESSED FOR WINTER IN DOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE

A young girl wearing a winter coat and winter hat poses for her photograph at Miller’s Photo Company in Dover, New Hampshire. She is wearing a striped coat with big buttons and has a large fur muff to warm her hands. Judging by my observation of many cabinet cards, the striped coat is not typical winter wear for the era. The large stripes on the coat makes it look like prison garb. Note the fake snow in the background of this image.  The reverse of the photograph has a printed advertisement that indicates that photographer Miller’s main gallery was located in Birmingham, Connecticut. The likely photographer of this cabinet card was William E. Miller. Miller had a number of studios located in Connecticut. His gallery locations included the towns of Ansonia, Birmingham, Derby and Shelton. Miller is credited with taking some of the photographs for a book entitled The History of the Old Town of Derby, Connecticut 1642-1880 (1880). To view other images by this photographer, click on the category “Photographer: Miller”.

Published in: on May 10, 2012 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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