SWEET LITTLE GIRL IN GINGHAM AND LACE IN FORT WAYNE, INDIANA GROWS UP TO BECOME A MEMBER OF THE FOREIGN SERVICE

SWEET GIRLA sweet looking little girl wearing gingham and lace poses for her portrait at the studio of F. Schanz in Fort Wayne, Indiana. She is wearing a high collar dress and the beginning of a smile. Note her wide eyes. The reverse of the photograph identifies the young subject as being Ruth Wheelock. To view other photographs by Felix Schanz and to learn more about him, click on the category “Photogapher: Schanz”. Research reveals that Ruth Wheelock grew up to live an interesting life. She was born 6/29/1891. Her father, Kent Kane Wheelock (1857-1928), was a physician living in Fort Wayne. Ruth’s mother was Matilda Henderson (1858-1958). A Fort Wayne newspaper story (1907) reports that Ruth attended school out of state in Staunton, Virginia. After finishing school she did a lot of traveling abroad which is reflected in her many passport applications that can be found in the archives. Records indicate that at least through 1919 she spent much time working and traveling through Europe. She spent time in France, Spain, Italy, and likely other countries. She held a number of interesting jobs. She was a Spanish correspondent and translator with a large publishing house (in Buffalo, NY). She worked as a clerk in American Embassies in Europe. The 1920 census reveals that she was a clerk in the American embassy in Italy. She held the same job title at the American Embassy in Germany, according to the 1930 census. She also worked as a French correspondent for the Society of Fatherless Children in France. In addition, she worked as a teacher of language at the European School of Music. Ruth Wheelock lived what appears to be a very interesting life. She never married and died in Easton, Maryland on 8/11/1957.

 

 

 

Published in: on April 21, 2014 at 3:01 pm  Comments (3)  
Tags: , , ,

A WOMAN WITH INTENSE EYES AND AN INTENSE HAT IN FORT WAYNE, INDIANA

LADY HAT F_0002The woman in this cabinet card photograph is identified as “Hattie Sugle”. Her name appears in an inscription on the reverse of the photograph. Hattie has intense eyes and is wearing an interesting large hat. Research could not garner any further information about this individual. The photographer of this image is John A. Shoaff (1836-1921) who operated a photography studio in Fort Bend, Indiana. To learn more about this photographer and to view more of his photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Shoaff”.

store

 

Published in: on February 13, 2014 at 11:48 am  Comments (2)  
Tags: , , ,

STAGE AND SILENT FILM ACTRESS MABEL TRUNELLE IN FORT WAYNE, INDIANA

MABEL TRUNELLE_0004

This cabinet card features stage and film actress Mabel Trunnell (1879-1981). The reverse of the photograph is inscribed “Yours Truly, Mabel Trunnell 1898”. Therefore, this image captures Miss Trunnell at about age nineteen. Mabel Trunnell was born in Dwight, Illinois. She began her career as an actress of the stage but at age thirty-two she began to appear in films. In 1911 she appeared in “A Modern Cinderella, In the Days of Chivalry” and in “The Star Spangled Banner”. Her last film was in 1923 when she was in the movie “The Love Trap”. Her filmography on IMDb indicates that she acted in 199 different films. At the age of forty-four she returned to the stage. She was married to Herbert Prior, an early British film star. Trunnell was one of Hollywood’s first movie stars as was identified with Edison Studios. A magazine article in “The Moving Picture World” (1915) reviews one of her performance. The reviewer wrote “Mabel Trunnell becomes more attractive as the course of time silvers her hair”. An interesting sociological comment was also made by the reviewer which was in regard to the admirable strength portrayed by Trunnell’s character. The reviewer notes “most of us are tired of seeing women pictured as incurable weaklings”. The reviewer was certainly a man who was ahead of his time. This cabinet card was produced by the Barrows studio in Fort Wayne, Indiana. It appears that Miss Trunnell was photographed in a costume from one of her performances. She is dressed very much like a maid and seems a bit troubled in her pose. The photographer, Frank Rufus Barrows operated a studio in Fort Wayne between 1880 and 1900. He is considered one of the city’s most prolific photographers and had several locations while in business there. He was born in Sturgis, Michigan in 1854. He came to Fort Wayne in 1880 and partnered with Frank H. Clayton in operating a photographic studio. In about a years time he became the sole proprietor of the studio. He had many photos appear in Fort Wayne Illustrated (1897). He left Indiana for Medford, Massachusetts and operated a studio there until 1910 when he moved to Eugene, Oregon where he died in 1920.

VIOLINIST LOUIE DUDENHOFER AND HIS UNIDENTIFIED ACCORDION PLAYING SIDEKICK IN FORT WAYNE, INDIANA

This photograph features two musicians posing for their portrait at the Jarrard Studio in Fort Wayne, Indiana. According to an inscription on the reverse of the photograph, the violinist is named “Louie Dudenhofer” and he is the “Brother to Jeanette”. The second musician is unidentified and he is holding his accordion. The photographer, Harry R. Jarrard was born in Indiana in 1852. He is known to have been a photographer from at least 1889 through 1910. He is thought  to have arrived in Fort Wayne in 1886 and in 1888 married Emma Short. His photography business in Fort Wayne occupied several locations during its existence.

Published in: on March 25, 2012 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , ,

PORTRAIT OF A LOVELY COUPLE IN FORT WAYNE, INDIANA

This cabinet card is a portrait of a fashionable couple posing in a Fort Wayne, Indiana, photographic studio. Note that both subjects are wearing gloves; the man is wearing black gloves while the woman is wearing white gloves. The photographer is John A. Shoaff (1836-1921). Shoaff was born in Juanita, Pennsylvania and moved with his family to Fort Wayne at the age of twelve. He operated his business in Fort Wayne until his retirement in 1894. He died at the age of 85, in Fort Wayne. To view other photographs by this photographer, click on the category “Photographer: Shoaff”.

Published in: on November 9, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
Tags: , , , ,

MADAM NAOMI: SIDE SHOW FAT LADY (562 POUNDS) OFFERS ESPECIALLY LARGE DOWRY TO PROCURE A HUSBAND

This cabinet card features Madam Naomi, who appears to have been a side show “fat lady”. The term “fat lady” is a despicable and derogatory way of describing someone overweight; yet the term found common use at circuses and fairs of the era of this photograph. Pencilled on the reverse of this image  is the information that Madame Naomi was born in Michigan and at the time of the photograph, she was 30 years old. A further “fact” provided is that her arms had a circumference of 27 inches.  Madam Naomi is not looking too comfortable in this portrait. She is wearing an interesting hat and one would guess that it would take her a long time to button all those buttons on the front of her dress. The newspaper The Weekly Statement (1890) has an article about a Madam Naomi appearance in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The article states that Naomi was advertised to appear in a museum and to “bestow her hand, heart, oleaginous sweetness, and a deed to a $5,000 farm to any young man who would marry her”. The offer was accepted by an insurance man from New York, Thomas J. Crowley; who came to Fort Bend and joined her on the museum stage to accept her hand in marriage. The photographer of this image is Baker, whose studio was located in Columbus, Ohio. There were many photographers named Baker operating out of Columbus when this photograph was taken. Many of the Bakers were relatives who operated the Baker Art Gallery. It is not clear which Baker or which studio is the source of this image. However, the initials below the photograph appear to be “LMB” which would indicate that the photographer was Lorenzo Marvin Baker (1834-1924).L. M. Baker was  part of the Baker Art Gallery family. To view other photographs by the Baker Art Gallery, click on the category “Photographer: Baker Art Gallery”.

WOMAN IN FORT WAYNE, INDIANA: DRESSED FOR AN OCCASION

This Cabinet Card is an image of a teenager or young woman posing in a special dress for what is apparently a special day. She is holding a small book and flowers. She is wearing dress gloves and a corsage. Perhaps this is a portrait of her confirmation day. The props in the photograph are quite elaborate and that should not be a surprise once one learns about the photographer.  The photographer is F. Schanz of Ft Wayne, Indiana. Research reveals that Felix Schanz (1861-?) was born in France and educated in Germany. He came to the United States at age 18 and worked as a photographer for three years in New York City. He arrived in Fort Wayne, Indiana in 1881. “The Pictorial History of Fort Wayne, Indiana” , published in 1917; states that Schanz was a well known and popular businessman who lived in Fort Wayne nearly 40 years. He had a number of successive studios but the one that he built in 1914 allowed drivers to drive into the building to obtain photographs of their car and the car’s occupants. Schanz also expanded his studio to work in the area of motion picture photography. He was an innovator and his studios were described as quite grand. to view other photographs by Schanz, click on the category “Photographer: Schanz”.

Published in: on January 29, 2010 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
Tags: , ,