PRETTY WOMAN AND HER UNUSUAL HAT (POST CABINET CARD ERA PHOTOGRAPH)

snider

This post cabinet card era photograph features a portrait of a beautiful well dressed woman. She is wearing a large and unusual hat. In my opinion, calling the hat unusual is an act of kindness. There are certainly more befitting descriptions. The identity and location of the photographer responsible for this very fine photograph is unknown. There is an inscription on the reverse of the image reveals that this lovely lady’s name is “E. Snider Smith”. This photograph measures about 5 3/4″ x 4″.

 

Published in: on July 18, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY WOMAN WEARING A BLACK AND WHITE FEATHERED HAT (FORT WAYNE, INDIANA)

ostrich

A pretty woman poses for her portrait at the New Hamilton Art Gallery in Fort Wayne, Indiana. She looks quite fashionable in her dark dress and wonderful hat. The feathers on the hat are neatly divided into halves of black and white. She is wearing a necklace and is leaning on a high backed chair. She looks very pensive. Advertising on the reverse of the photograph reveals that the studio was located on the corner of Calhoun and Columbia Streets. In addition, the advertising lists the cost of cabinet cards as being 2 dollars per dozen. As an added marketing technique, the studio will do a free 25 dollar oil portrait for one of every thirty customers. Apparently the photographer who operated this studio was a creative marketer as well as a creative photographer.

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Published in: on March 20, 2016 at 5:14 pm  Comments (3)  
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PRETTY WOMAN WEARING A BIRD NEST HAT

bird nest

This vintage real photo postcard features a pretty woman wearing a bird nest hat. At least it looks like a bird nest. This young woman has the beauty to wear this unusual hat and look terrific rather than silly. The postcard is of French origin and was published in Paris. The Publisher’s logo “LL” can be seen on the front of the postcard. The postcard is part of a series (#123). “LL” postcards were produced for France, England, United States, and other nations. For many years postcard collecting experts believed the logo stood for Louis Levy but there was no real supporting evidence and that belief died around 1991. Later research arrived at the conclusion that the initials “LL” stand for (Moyse) Leon and his son-in-law (Isaac) Levy. Leon and Levy began their career as assistants with the Parisian photographic studio Ferrier-Souilier. The pair began their own photographic studio in 1862. Leon and Levy’s studio won a gold medal at the 1867 Universal Exhibition. Leon left the partnership in 1872 and Levy kept the business going and continued to use the “LL” logo. The company was renamed Levy Fils et Cie. Levy died in 1913 and the company was later bought by the printer Emile Crete.

 

A WOMAN WITH INTENSE EYES AND AN INTENSE HAT IN FORT WAYNE, INDIANA

LADY HAT F_0002The woman in this cabinet card photograph is identified as “Hattie Sugle”. Her name appears in an inscription on the reverse of the photograph. Hattie has intense eyes and is wearing an interesting large hat. Research could not garner any further information about this individual. The photographer of this image is John A. Shoaff (1836-1921) who operated a photography studio in Fort Bend, Indiana. To learn more about this photographer and to view more of his photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Shoaff”.

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Published in: on February 13, 2014 at 11:48 am  Comments (2)  
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PORTRAIT OF A COUPLE IN CHATSWORTH, ILLINOIS (JOSEPH AND ELLA FRANCIS)

This cabinet card features a couple posing for their portrait at the studio of A. H. Hall in Chatsworth, Illinois. The gentleman has an interesting long and narrow beard, The woman has a dress with many buttons and is wearing a pin on her collar. Note the mans hat is on the floor directly in front of where the couple is sitting. It is not uncommon to see cabinet card portraits that include hats prominently displayed on the floor. Perhaps the hats were viewed as important enough to belong in the picture but it was considered inappropriate to wear hats indoors. The couple in this photograph are identified on the reverse as Joseph and Ella Francis.  Investigation reveals that Joseph Francis served in the civil war. In 1864 he enlisted as a private in Company D of the Illinois 45th Infantry Regiment.He mustered out as a private in 1865.  The 1880 US census identifies Joseph S. Francis (1846-1930) as a farmer of Irish descent living in Illinois. The 1910 census finds the Ohio born, Francis living in Forrest, Illinois and working as a railroad car inspector. He was 64 years old at the time and living with his wife Ella Svedaker Williamson Francis (1862-1938) and four of their children. The 1930 census that Joseph Francis, at age 84, was still employed. He was working as an assessor for his township. Research found death certificates for both Joseph (1930) and Ella (1938).  The photographer of this image was Albert H. Hall. The History of Livingston County (1878) provides a brief biography of Hall. He was born in 1849 and at age 22 went to Chicago to learn the trade of photography. In 1872 he moved to Chartsworth and opened a photography and gem gallery. He married a woman named Dora Knapp.

PORTRAIT OF TWO WOMAN IN MASSIVE HATS

The Cabinet Card Gallery is fortunate to have many historical fashion experts  among its visitors. Hopefully, one or more of them will leave comments that offer an explanation about the history behind the hats seen in this cabinet card. The two women featured in this image are wearing shawls and massive hats. Are these hats part of a uniform or costume of some sort of order or organization? Are these hats on steroids? There is no identifying information concerning the subjects or the photographer written on either side of the cabinet card.

Published in: on September 18, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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BUFFALO LADY DISCOVERED UNDER GIGANTIC OUTRAGEOUS HAT

A nicely dressed and beautiful young woman poses for her portrait at the Werner Art Gallery. A. L. Werner operated his studio out of 101-103 Genesee Street in Buffalo, New York. The woman is identified on the reverse of the photograph as “Aunt Christine”.  She appears to be very fashionable but her millinery taste is somewhat suspect. By today’s standards, her hat can best be described as ostentatious. However, her choice in headwear was likely quite stylish for her time. To view other photographs by Werner and to learn more about him, click on the category “Photographer: Werner”.

Published in: on August 31, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (4)  
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CUTE LITTLE GIRL STANDING ON A CHAIR IN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

This cabinet card features an adorable little girl standing on a chair in front of an unusual backdrop. She is wearing a lace bib, a necklace and a wonderful hat. The photographers name is not quite legible. His last name appears to be “Vitaliny”. His studio was located at 233 Montgomery Avenue in San Francisco, California. No biographical information about the photographer could be located.  The photographic card has gold beveled edges and is larger than the standard cabinet card. This photographic is 8.5″ x 6.25″. It can best be desribed as a “Boudoir Card”. An article on types of cabinet cards  asserts that boudoir cards are usually 8.5″ x 5.5″.

Published in: on July 12, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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ATTRACTIVE WOMAN WITH A TALL FANCY HAT AND A SCARF IN PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS

An attractive woman with a tall fancy hat and a scarf poses for her portrait at the Clark studio in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. The photographer of this image is Forester Clark. He was cited in the Photographic Times (1988) because his eight year=old daughter Eva wrote a letter to then President Grover Cleveland which included six winter and six summer views of Pittsfield street scenes. She received a reply from the President with the salutation of “My Dear Young Friend”,  and the letter went on to say, among other things, that he found the photographs very interesting. Clark is also mentioned in the Photographic Journal of America (1893) for announcing that he was leaving Pittsfield (he lived there 21 years) and moving to Montpelier, Vermont to become treasurer of the Excelsior Granite Works. The article reported that Clark had taken 31,000 negatives while in Pittsfield. Clark was a veteran of the civil war. He enlisted in 1861 and was discharged in 1862 with the rank of Private. He was a member of the 5th Wisconsin Infantry. The 1880 US census reveals that Clark was born in Vermont in 1836. He married his wife, Emma, in 1862. He had four children aged one through thirteen. The 1900 census found Clark living in the Bronx, New York with his wife and two of his children. He was employed as a granite salesman. The 1910 census indicates that Clark was living in Cheshire, Massachusetts with his wife and that at 73 years-old, he was working once again as a photographer.

A LOVELY YOUNG LADY AND HER HAT

A lovely young lady is featured in this photographic portrait. She is beautifully dressed and is wearing a hat that is nicely adorned with flowers. The name of the photographer and his location are unknown.

Published in: on March 21, 2012 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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