WOMAN IN BUSTLE STYLE DRESS IN OMAHA, NEBRASKA

This  photograph features a woman in a bustle style dress posing for a full length portrait at the Gray studio in Omaha, Nebraska. The dress seems to play a more prominent role than the subject in this cabinet card image. In 1884 Howard E. Gray took over the Bee Hive Gallery at the address listed on this cabinet card. In about 1886 he changed the name of the studio to the H. E. Gray Studio. Omaha business directories indicate that he was operating a photography studio in Omaha  from 1884 through 1896. The 1896 directory announces that Gray had moved to Houston, Texas. Research was able to pick up Gray’s trail in Houston. Business directories state that he was a photo retoucher in in 1897 and from 1899 through 1911 operated a photography studio. Research yielded no definitive information about his family. He may be listed in the 1900 US census but there is no confirmation that Howard E. Gray listed is the same Howard E. Gray who worked as a photographer. The 1900 census Mr. Gray was 36 years-old and married to Maggie Gray (age 38). The couple was married in 1885 and had a son named Elmont (age 12). Interestingly, the census Mr Gray was listed as working as a stenographer. To view other photographs by Gray, click on the category “Photographer: Gray (NE)”.

Published in: on November 29, 2012 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A TIRED OLD MAN IN TEXAS (PHOTOGRAPH BY CAPTAIN HARVEY ROBERTS MARKS)

This image captures the portrait of a tired looking old man. This gentleman appears to have had better days. He looks exhausted and troubled. This photograph was taken by the Mark’s studio in Austin, Texas. The photographer of this cabinet card lived an interesting life and he was both a pioneer of Texas and a pioneer of photography. Harvey Roberts Marks (1821-1902) was a well known photographer who worked in a number of locations. He was active in Baltimore, Maryland (1849-1853), San Francisco, California (1851), Mobile, Alabama  (1856-1859), Houston, Texas (1865-1870), and Austin, Texas (1870-1902). He was born in New York City. He first arrived in Texas in 1838 and received a very large land grant in Harris County (Houston). He enlisted in a company of Texas Rangers in 1840 and reached the rank of Captain. He was married to Emily H. Bassan in 1849. Research indicates that she was  member of one of the most prominent families in Baltimore. In 1849 he was Jacob Shew’s partner in the Shew and Mark’s Gallery in Baltimore. He continued the gallery alone when Shew left Baltimore until 1851. The 1850 census revealed that he had three assistants in the gallery and took 5,000 daguerreotypes annually. In 1851 he took photographs of castaways from a Japanese ship involved in an incident that caught national attention. Mark’s moved to Austin in 1870 and opened a gallery a year later. During that time he became Vice President of the National Photographic Association. Marks served during the civil war. He was a member of the Houston Battalion, Texas Infantry (Detailed Men). Research was unsuccessful in gathering this Confederate regiment’s history. Marks entered the regiment and left the regiment as a Captain.  Interestingly, when former Confederacy President, Jefferson Davis, visited Austin in 1875, he sat in Mark’s studio for his portrait. He died at the age of 81.

ANNIE AND MAGGIE: YOUNG SISTERS POSE IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

Annie and Maggie Fleming pose for this cabinet card portrait at the Anderson’s photographic studio, located at 85 Main Street in Houston, Texas. An inscription on the reverse of the card identifies the little girls and indicates that this photograph was given to their cousin. These cute siblings appear to be a bit dubious of the photographer and their photographic session. The photographer, Samuel Anderson, operated out of the address on this cabinet card, between 1886 and 1892. To see other photographs by Sam Anderson, click on this sites category, “Photographer: Anderson”.

Published in: on August 25, 2010 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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PRETTY WOMAN PHOTOGRAPHED IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

Lizzie Davant is photographed by Samuel Anderson in his studio located in Houston, Texas. The beautiful Ms Davant gave the photograph to her Uncle Jim and inscribed the back of the card. Samuel Anderson was truly a pioneer photographer. He worked as a photographer for many years in New Orleans and then had studios first in Galveston, and then in Houston. He wrote that he selected Houston because he believed in would become the “metropolis” of Texas. He worked in Houston in 1853-1854 and 1884-c 1901. In 1856, Anderson had a wood engraved portrait published by Frank Leslie. To see other photographs by Samuel Anderson, click on this site’s category of “Photographer: Anderson”.