A FASHIONABLE WOMAN FROM JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY

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A fashionable young woman holding a flower poses for her photographic portrait at the J. H. Steiner studio in Jersey City, New Jersey. She is wearing earrings and rings. She appears to be wearing a corset judging by her shapely figure. Her ethnic origin is unknown but it is unlikely that her family came to America on the Mayflower.

Published in: on October 9, 2014 at 8:00 am  Comments (3)  
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CORINNE: FAMOUS CHILD ACTRESS AND SUBJECT OF A SENSATIONAL CHILD ABUSE CASE

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The actress pictured in these cabinet cards is Corrine.  Corrine, like Elvis or Selena, was a performer that received national recognition and was known by just her first name. In the top portrait by celebrity photographer B. J. Falk, Corrine looks to be teenager or young adult. She is dressed in theatrical costume. Corinne was the daughter of actress Jennie Kimball. Kimball acted in the theater between 1865 and 1873. The year of her retirement, she became the mother of Corinne, who the New York Times (1896) labelled “the most famous of all the child actresses of this country”. It is not clear how Kimball and her husband came to raise Corinne, but is was speculated that she was adopted as an orphan. Kimball trained her young daughter for the stage. Corrine debuted in the theater at age two and a half.  At five years of age she played the part of  “Little Buttercup” in the Boston production of “Pinafore”. She played the role more than one hundred times. At fifteen years of age she was traveling as head of her own theater company. Jennie Kimball doubled as Corinne’s mother and manager. The New York Times (1896) reported that Corinne “was a goldmine” during her early days for Mrs. Kimball and remained a major money producer through the time the article was written. At the time the article appeared, Corinne was twenty-two years old.  Jennie Kimball’s successful management of her daughter’s career wasn’t appreciated by all observers. The New York Times (1881) asserted that the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children objected to the way Corinne was being raised and successfully pursued custody of the child. During the custody hearing, eight year-old Corinne was put on the stand and interrogated by the society’s lawyer. He asked her how many times she was photographed and she didn’t know but said “she was never photographed in tights nor with her limbs and breast exposed”. The lawyer’s questioning revealed that the child had never attended school. However, Jennie Kimball did give her “lessons” each morning. The lawyer then gave Corinne an impromptu writing/spelling test during her testimony. The attorney also prompted the child to say she had never attended sunday school and didn’t know what a bible was nor had she ever been taught anything about Jesus Christ. The society lawyer was initially able to convince the judge to remove the child from the custody of Mrs Kimball because she was “unlawfully exhibited and employed” in dancing, singing and acting on the theatrical stage. Mrs. Kimball was allowed to take her daughter for a brief period to change her clothing but was assigned an escort to insure that the child would be brought to the society. Mrs Kimball was advised by George Hackett, the manager of a Providence opera house that if she took her daughter from New York to Jersey City, New Jersey; the girl would be out of the courts jurisdiction and she could keep her daughter. Mrs. Kimball followed his suggestion, and allowed a man to spirit the child out of state. As a result, Mrs. Kimball was charged with abduction and she ended up back in court. After a short time, the judge considered all the testimony that he heard and decided to return Corinne to her parents (he called them guardians). He believed that they were loving toward the child and responsible enough to continue raising her. Interestingly, he had something to say about the religious angle pursued by the society lawyer. The judge wrote that the the US constitution protected Corinne’s parents from being punished for not providing religious education to their daughter.  Corinne continued her acting career and eventually became involved in burlesque theater. The New York Times (1894) wrote “Corinne has grown up and proves a lively and entertaining performer. The article adds that “she has no large share of original talent, musical or dramatic, but she can sing and dance “well enough”. The second cabinet card picturing Miss Corinne was published by Newsboy (#20 of a series). She is wearing jewelry galore and flowers in her hair. What is that contraption that she is wearing around her waist? Is it a pouch? If so, what is it meant to carry? Hopefully some cabinet card gallery visitors with fashion expertise can explain her unusual dress.

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PORTRAIT OF A “JERSEY GIRL”

A pretty girl poses for photographer Albert Vetter in either Hoboken or Jersey City, New Jersey. This “Jersey Girl’s” portrait is captured in a crisp and clear image. She is wearing a frilly dress and a ribbon pinned near her shoulder. In addition, she is wearing a necklace with a pendant, and she is wearing it over the collar of her dress where it is hardly visible. The photographer, Albert Vetter, was quite an interesting character. To learn more about him, and to view more of his photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Vetter”.

Published in: on April 1, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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EXQUISITE LOOKING “JERSEY GIRL”

An exquisite looking teen beauty poses for her portrait at the studio of Fieldman. Fieldman had two galleries, and they were located in Newark and Jersey City, New Jersey. This Jersey girl has a fine hat and a fine figure. The photographer of this cabinet card photograph was Isidore Fieldman (1869-?). He was born in Russia and arrived in America during 1891. He was listed as a photographer in the 1900 through the 1930 U.S. Census. He and his wife Rose (born in Poland) spoke Yiddish, indicating that they were of the Jewish faith. During at least some of their years, the couple and their family lived in Elizabeth, New Jersey. Their children included Esther (born 1890), Milton (born 1901), Margaret (born 1901), Herman (born 1906), George (born 1914). Milton and Margaret were likely twins. Herman joined his father’s photography business.

Published in: on January 5, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (4)  
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RUFFIAN LOOKING MAN POSES FOR RUFFIAN PHOTOGRAPHER WITH A NEW IDEA IN PICTURE HANGING (NEW JERSEY)

An intense looking gentleman poses for his portrait at the studio of Albert Vetter. Vetter operated two photographic galleries in New Jersey; one was in Jersey City, while the other was located in Hoboken.  The man in this photograph is dressed formally, like a gentleman;  but he has the look of a ruffian. Could be an interesting story about the discrepancy, but no identifying information is available about the man in this photograph. On the subject of ruffians, wait until you hear about the photographer of this image. The magazine, The Camera and the Darkroom ( 1904) reported that Vetter was at odds with the family that lived in the house that was also the home of his studio. Vetter got a picture of the  head of the family, who recently died. He enlarged the picture and fastened a rope  around it at the neck, and hung it out the window. The daughter of the late man, got a step ladder and removed the photograph. A “war of words” followed and Vetter was arrested. He was arraigned in front of a judge for disorderly conduct and he was put up for bond to maintain the peace. The magazine used a humorous headline to describe this incident;  “New Idea in Picture Hanging”.

Published in: on November 6, 2011 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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PRETTY LADY WITH EXCELLENT FASHION SENSE IN WEST HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY

This pretty West Hoboken lady dressed cool, before cool was invented. She clearly mastered the layered look, and the combination of textures composing her outfit, is phenomenal. Her very busy, but interesting hat, also adds to her “look”. This woman knew how to put herself together and likely was well aware that she had this talent. She is posed for this photograph in a studio faux park like setting  which includes a live plant. The photographer is Charles A. Henkel. His studio was located in West Hoboken, New Jersey,  from 1893 through at least 1900. An advertisement in the Photographic Times (1884) indicates that Henkel previously had a studio in Jersey City Heights, New Jersey.

Published in: on July 27, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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FASHIONABLE WOMAN IN NEW YORK CITY

A young woman in a pretty dress poses for the photographer at the studio of Hargrave & Gubelman in New York City, New York. The Post Office Guide (1890) has an advertisement for the studio which indicates that A. J. Hargrave managed the New York City Studio while Theodore Gubelman managed their second studio, which was located in Jersey City, New Jersey. To view other photographs by Hargrave, click on the category “Photographer: Hargrave”.

Published in: on May 3, 2010 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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