BALDING MAN WITH MUTTON CHOPS IN OLEAN, NEW YORK

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A well dressed balding man compensates for his hair deficit by wearing wonderful mutton chops and a handsome mustache. This wide eyed gentleman’s facial hair represents tonsorial genius. The photographer of this cabinet card photograph is the studio of Winsor & Whipple in Olean, New York. This photograph was taken in 1903 or before. “The Photographic Journal of America” (1903) reported the dissolution of the partnership between Winsor and Whipple. The article reported that H. C. Whipple needed to retire due to failing health and that he was planning to move to Colorado.

Published in: on February 24, 2015 at 10:00 pm  Comments (3)  
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A MAN WITH AN OUTSTANDING MUSTACHE IN PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

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The gentleman is this cabinet card portrait has a wonderful mustache. It has been perfectly trimmed and maintained. He posed for this photograph at the studio of Oliver Boudnas De Morat which was located at the southwest corner of 8th and Market in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. De Morat was a pioneer photographer. An article in “Photographic Mosaics” (1867) makes mention of his endorsing a certain photographic product. He is also cited in “The Philadelphia Photographer” (1870). He is considered  to have been among the most prolific producers of cdv portraits. He was born in Montreal, Canada in 1836 and died in Philadelphia in 1902. To view photographs of unusual and interesting mustaches, click on cabinet card gallery’s category “Mustaches (Only the Best).

Published in: on February 13, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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A MUSTACHIOED YOUNG MAN AND HIS BICYCLE IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

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This cabinet card features a mustachioed young man dressed in his sport clothing and standing beside his bicycle. At the time of this photograph, bike riding was a popular sport and many riders were members of bicycle clubs. Note that this gentleman is wearing knickers. This photograph was taken at the Lawrence studio in Chicago, Illinois. The photographer of this image was Adolph P. Lawrence who operated a studio in Chicago between 1887 and 1900.

 

Published in: on January 30, 2015 at 12:23 pm  Comments (2)  
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UNCLE ALBERT: SUBJECT OF A PAUL MCCARTNEY SONG, OWNER OF MAGNIFICENT MUSTACHE, AND HUSBAND OF PHOEBE

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In 1971 Paul and Linda McCartney released a song called “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”. It was a popular song from the “Ram” album. McCartney stated that the song is a tribute to his real life Uncle Albert. Finally, a portrait of Uncle Albert has been discovered and the Cabinet Card Gallery is proud to display it. Actually, I fabricated the connection between this cabinet card portrait and Paul McCartney’s uncle because I needed a story line. However, this cabinet card is remarkable in it’s own right. Uncle Albert’s mustache is a truly quite impressive and propels his image to the cabinet card gallery’s category “Mustaches (Only the Best)”. The photographer of this fine image is unidentified.

Published in: on November 30, 2014 at 12:02 pm  Comments (4)  
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BALD MAN WITH WALRUS MUSTACHE IN BUFFALO, NEW YORK

BLISS BROTHERS_0001The gentleman in this cabinet card portrait, like the lyrics of the well known Beatles song, seems to me to be saying, “I  am the walrus.”. The well dressed bald man posed at Bliss Brother’s studio in Buffalo, New York. The studio was located at 368 Main Street (at the corner of Eagle).To learn more about photographers Harry and Frank Bliss and to view more of their photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Bliss Brothers”.

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Published in: on March 3, 2014 at 1:03 pm  Leave a Comment  
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TWO COUPLES AND A SMALL DOG IN WAASASSA, FINLAND

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Signe Liljequist photographed these two couples and a small dog in his studio in Waasassa, Finland. It is very possible that the older pair are the parents of the two younger adults. The younger and older man share what appears to be a family resemblance. The four subjects in this photograph are nicely dressed and the younger man has an admirable mustache. To view other great mustaches, click on the category “Mustaches (Only the Best)”. The town of Waasassa has held a number of other names over history. Presently, the town is called Vaasa. To view other Finnish photographs, click on the category “Finland”.

Published in: on November 19, 2013 at 12:20 pm  Leave a Comment  
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LOVELY COUPLE IN RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

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A lovely couple poses for their portrait in Richmond, Virginia. She is wearing a fancy hat and he is wearing a Bowler and a fancy mustache (click on the category “Mustaches (Only the Best) to view additional extraordinary facial hair). The high collared woman in this image has a pin on her collar, and she is wearing earrings and a thin long necklace. The couple appears to be dressed in their best clothing. The reverse of this photograph identifies this man and woman as being Percy and Loula Clarke. At the time that this picture was taken, this young couple was just starting off their life together. They must have wondered what was ahead for them. Research was able to uncover some of what actually did lie ahead for this young and attractive couple. The 1920 US census found Thomas Percy Clark (1873-1968) and his wife Loula Robertson Clarke (1876-1963) living on their family farm in Namozine, Virginia. Thomas and Loula lived with their five children aged 6 through 19. The nineteen year-old, Lurleen, was a public school teacher. Thomas must have been proud of his educated oldest daughter because he had dropped out of school after completing the seventh grade. By the time that the 1930 census was completed, the Clarke’s had only two children living at home with them in Namozine. The 1940 US census found the couple still living in Namozine. Thomas lived a very long life (96 years). It’s amazing to think that he was born four years after the civil war and died the same year that Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy were assassinated. He experienced a major portion of US history. Both Thomas and Loula are buried in the Mizpah cemetery in Dimwiddie County, Virginia. The New York Art Gallery, located in Richmond Virginia, produced this excellent cabinet card portrait.

A GENTLEMAN AND HIS MUTTON CHOPS IN WOOLWICH, ENGLAND

WOOLWICH MAN_0001A man with distinctive muttonchops poses for his portrait at the C. J. Farlie studio in Woolwich. Charles James Farlie  (1839-1901) was located at 74 Wellington. The town of Woolwich is part of greater London. Farlie worked as a photographer in the town between the 1860’s and 1880’s. He was married twice. One of his wives was Selina Louisa Farlie who died in 1873 at the age of 32. The subject of this photograph is formally dressed and is wearing the usual pocket watch with the chain exposed under his coat. The gentleman’s interesting facial hair gains him entry into the Cabinet Card Gallery’s category of “Mustaches (Only the Best). Peruse the intriguing facial hair by clicking the category.

Published in: on September 28, 2013 at 6:47 pm  Leave a Comment  
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HANDSOME MAN WITH FORMIDABLE MUSTACHE IN NEW YORK CITY

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A formally dressed gentleman poses for his portrait at the Alman & Company studio in New York City. He has a great bushy mustache which earns a spot in the category “Mustaches (Only the Best)”. Click on this category to view other facial hair masterpieces. Note the man’s wide lapels and bow tie. One source states that Louis Alman (1835-?) was active in New York City and Newport, Rhode Island from the 1870’s through 1920. The dates have not been confirmed by research.

Published in: on September 24, 2013 at 8:21 pm  Comments (3)  
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A GENTLEMAN AND HIS GIANT MUSTACHE IN BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

brooklyn mustash_0004A man with a partial beard, mutton chops, and a very bushy mustache is captured by photographer George Frank E. Pearsall. The address of Pearsall’s studio was 298 Fulton Street in Brooklyn, New York. This portrait earns a spot in the cabinet card gallery’s category “Mustaches (Only the Best)”. Take a look at the category for some very interesting facial hair images. Frank Pearsall was born in New York City. His father was a life boat builder. Pearsall’s parents died when he was young and he and his two brothers were raised by an aunt in Saratoga, New York. In 1852 he began to learn about the photography business from his uncle who operated a gallery. After two years, his uncle left for Australia and the business failed despite Pearsall’s aunt’s efforts. Frank and his older brother left for an adventure and they spent eight years in such places as Cuba, West Indies, Venezuela, and elsewhere. In 1862 he returned to New York and worked as a positionist with celebrated New York City photographer Benjamin Gurney (see category “Photographer: Gurney”). He refined his skills working in the Gurney studio. In 1866 he married Long Islander Elizabeth Conrow. In 1870 he opened a photographic studio in Brooklyn which operated for two years at which point he moved his business to the 298 Fulton Street address. An 1880 advertisement asserted that Pearsall’s studio was the largest one in Brooklyn. Pearsall developed a historic camera in 1883. The camera was called the “Pearsall’s Compact Camera” and was unique in that it came in its own “carrying case” that also housed needed accessories. This design was imitated by all of the major camera manufacturers through the 1920’s. The British Journal of Photography (1876) published an article pertaining to a court case involving Pearsall. The case, Pearsall vs Schenck. was followed by photographers through out the United States because it involved a matter of universal importance to their business. The case concerned a couple that set for 17 poses at Pearsall’s studio. He sent them the proofs and they returned them. The couple contended that they did not like the pictures and would not pay for them. Pearsall demanded payment regardless of whether the couple liked the pictures. The journal took the side of Pearsall when they wrote that photography does not make “the human face divine”, it only reproduces it. The journal argued that the photographer does not have the responsibility of the painter to please the sitter for the portrait because the photographer can not control an image the way a painter can control a painting. Photographer can no change their subject’s “bad features”. The nose that is “snubby” will be “snubby” in photographs. “It is too bad to blame the poor photographer for the facial accidents of nature”. Tongue in cheek, the journal suggests the couple should have paid their bill or else the photographer might put their portraits in the gallery’s main display cases to be seen by all visitors. Pearsall won the legal case and the couple was ordered to pay for the photographs. The New York Times (1876) also reported this story but was less supportive of Pearsall. However, their article stated that the photographer should be paid for his time and supplies. The Times also made an analogy concerning the relationship of medical doctor and patient. The article asserted that patients had to pay their doctors even when they were not cured by the doctors efforts. Research revealed two interesting side notes. Pearsall was the President of the Brooklyn Archery club and in 1881 was the Secretary and Treasurer of the National Archery Association. A second bit of trivia is that Pearsall’s brother, Alva Pearsall, was a camera operator for Matthew Brady in 1871.