MUTTON CHOPS MAN IN LEOMINSTER, MASSACHUSETTS

A distinguished older gentleman poses for his portrait at the Richardson studio in Leominster, Massachusetts. He is nicely dressed and wearing a wonderful necktie. He has wonderful silver mutton chops that the photographer has captured effectively in this image. Lucius Augustus Richardson was born in Leomister in 1840. After completing his education, he went to work as printer for four years. He then learned photography and began working as a travelling photographer throughout New England. He then spent three years in Boston followed by working three years in Ashland. In 1860 he married Louisa Fitch of Maine. In 1873 he opened a photography studio in Leomister. His daughter Lillian Janette Richardson worked in the studio as a retoucher and printer of photographs.

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A MAN AND HIS CHOPS IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

SIDEBURNS BALTIMORE_0001Meet Philip August Albrecht. His name is written in pencil on the reverse of this photograph. Mr Albrecht has chops. This image may be faded but it certainly does justice to his mutton chops. See more great facial hair in the categories “Beards (Only the Best)” and “Mustaches (Only the Best)”. Philip Albrecht appears in the 1870 US census. The document reveals that he was born in Prussia around 1843. He was employed as a bookkeeper and married to Anna Albrecht. The couple had two children, Emma (age 3) and John (age 10 months). Baltimore City Directories disclose that Philip Albrecht worked as a bookkeeper between at least 1868 and 1882. He worked as a cashier at least between 1888 and 1898. Albrecht died in 1909. This photograph was produced by William Foss Shorey (1833-1911) whose studio was located in Baltimore, Maryland. He was a well known photographer in Baltimore and operated there for more than forty years. He was born in Maine and the son of a furrier (Nehemiah Shorey). William graduated from the Maryland Institute of Art and Design and became a drawing instructor there at twenty-five years of age. He learned photography under the tutelage of H. E. Woodward who was associated with the Institute but also owned the Monumental Art Studio. Shorey’s obituary states that he was the official photographer of William “Buffalo Bill” Cody for the first ten years of his show business career. It was also reported that Shorey was the official photographer of the Maryland Department of the Grand Army of the Republic. He is buried in the Green Mount Cemetery in Baltimore.

CHARLES J. FOLGER: SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY UNDER PRESIDENT CHESTER ARTHUR

UThis cabinet card features Charles James Folger (1818-1884) who was an American lawyer and politician. He served as Secretary of the Treasury under President Chester Arthur. Folger was born in Nantucket, Massachusetts but lived most of his life in Geneva, New York. He attended Hobart College. His political career includes judgeships and some terms in the New York State Senate (1862-1869). While in the state senate, he served four years as President Pro Tempore. In 1869 he left state government after being appointed by President Ulysses Grant as the Assistant U.S. Treasurer. In 1870, he became a judge of the New York Court of Appeals and eventually became the Chief Judge. H eft the judgeship in 1881  to serve as Secretary of the Treasury, and during that tenure, he ran for Governor in New York against future U.S. President, Grover Cleveland. Folger had many accomplishments and he has just added a new honor to his legacy. Folger’s wonderful muttonchops, qualifies him to join the facial hair elite in the category of “Beards (Only the Best)”. Click on the category to view unusual styles of facial hair. This portrait was photographed by Falk, a well known New York City, celebrity photographer. To view other photographs by Falk, click on the category “Photographer: Falk”. A stamp on the reverse of  this cabinet card reveals that it was formerly owned by Culver Pictures of New York City, New York. Culver Pictures has been collecting photographs and illustrations from the 19th and first half of the 20th century, since 1926. These pictures are used in books, films, and other forms of media. At the time that this cabinet card was stamped by the company, Culver Pictures was located in New York City.

MUTTON CHOP MAN AND HIS WIFE AND BABY SIT FOR THEIR PORTRAIT IN DETROIT, MICHIGAN

This cabinet card photograph is a studio photograph of a young family posing as if they are sitting in an outside garden. The man has some impressive mutton chops that seem to be distracting his wife. The photographer is Smith whose studio was in Detroit, Michigan.

MAN WITH UNFRIENDLY MUTTON CHOPS IN PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

A gentleman with unfriendly mutton chops poses for his portrait at the studio of P. E. Chillman in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Why use the adjective “unfriendly”? The answer is that  the term “friendly” mutton chops refers to mutton chops that are joined by a mustache. This gentleman’s mutton chops lack a connecting mustache, thus, the mutton chops are not friendly. To learn more about Chillman and to view other photographs by him, click on the category “Photographer: Chillman”.

MUTTON CHOPS IN NEWBURGH, NEW YORK

A gentleman with mutton chop  sideburns,  poses for his photograph at the studio of L. Karmel in Newburgh, New York.

Published in: on March 29, 2010 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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