PRETTY AND AUSTERE: A YOUNG WOMAN IN NEW YORK CITY (PHOTOGRAPHED BY PACH, 1879)

pretty austere_0004This cabinet card portrait of a pretty and fashionable young woman is the work of G. W. Pach. The woman in the photograph appears quite austere but of course sometimes appearance can be deceptive. Pach, and the Pach Brothers, were celebrated photographers of their era. G. W. Pach’s studio at the time of this photograph was located at 841 Broadway at the corner of 13th Street in New York City. Pach also had branch studios at Harvard and Yale Universities as well as in Poughkeepsie and West Point, New York. In addition, there were branch studios in Long Branch and Ocean Grove, New Jersey. The aforementioned studios are all mentioned in print on the reverse of the cabinet card. Also on the back of the image is a pencilled date indicating that this photograph was taken in 1879. To learn more about the Pach Brothers and to view additional photographs taken by them , click on the category “Photographer: Pach Bros”.

PORTRAIT OF A PRETTY UNIDENTIFIED ACTRESS IN NEW YORK CITY

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This portrait features an attractive unidentified actress. This woman seems to love texture. Note the fabrics she is wearing. She has a wonderful feathered hat and a  shaggy stole. At least I think its a stole but I am uncertain and welcome intervention from a cabinet card gallery visitor knowledgeable about woman’s fashion. The woman looks quite handsome in her high collar dress and lovely accessories. The photograph was taken at Fredricks Knickerbocker Family Portrait Gallery in New York City (770 Broadway). To learn more about Mr. Fredricks and to view more of his images, click on the category “Photographer: Fredricks”.

 

Published in: on January 21, 2013 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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AREN’T YOU SOMEBODY FAMOUS? PORTRAIT OF UNIDENTIFIED MAN IN NEW YORK CITY (PHOTOGRAPHER: NAPOLEON SARONY)

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The gentleman featured  in this cabinet card portrait looks like someone famous. The photographer of this image is Napoleon Sarony who photographed many celebrities living in or visiting New York City. However, Sarony also photographed many non celebrities so there is no guarentee that the subject of this photograph is someone famous. He certainly does have great facial hair.  The reverese of this image is dated 1872. Printing on the reverse indicates that Sarony’s studio was located at 680 Broadway in New York City. The  printing lists two names associated with the studio; Napoleon Sarony and Alfred S. Campbell. To view other photographs by Sarony, click on the category “Photographer: Sarony”. To view photographs by Campbell, click on the category “Photographer: A. S. Campbell”.

UNIFORMED BAND MEMBER IN NEW YORK CITY

The young uniformed man in this cabinet card portrait appears to be a band member. However, it is also possible that he may be a cadet, a fireman, or a member of some other type of organization. His belt buckle has the letter “C” and the badge on his hat has the number “7″. Hopefully, a visitor to the cabinet card gallery may be able to pinpoint the exact type of unit that this subject represents. The photographer of this image is A. J. Hargrave. At the time of this photograph he was located at 68 West 23rd Street in New York City. To learn more about Hargrave and to view more of his photographs, click on the category “Photographer: Hargrave”.

Published in: on December 1, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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LOVING MOM IN POLKA DOT DRESS POSES WITH HER BABY IN NEW YORK CITY

A pretty young mother poses with her baby for a portrait by Charles Hoffman in New York City, New York. Mom certainly has no aversion to attracting attention judging by her polka dot dress and fantastic hat. She has a flair for putting an outfit together; her dress, hat, and dark gloves are a good match. Mother seems to also have no trouble showing affection to her young child. She holds her head very close to the baby head which is likely a reflection of the closeness she feels to her baby. The book, Great Industries Exchange and Commercial Review (1884), mentions photographer Charles Hoffmann. The citation states that he had recently established his 1288 Broadway studio after working 18 years in the “famous house of Sarony” in an important position. To view photographs by Napoleon Sarony, click on the category “Photographer: Sarony”.

Published in: on August 16, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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CUTE KIDS ON BROADWAY (NEW YORK CITY)

Two adorable kids pose for photographer Rud Bachmann whose studio was located on Broadway in New York City. The older child is holding a walking stick. It is very likely that the children are siblings. The photographer’s full name is Rudolph Bachmann. He was born in 1850 in Switzerland. He came to the United States in about 1880 and by 1884 was operating a photography business at 1437 Broadway in New York City. The gallery remained at that address until 1922 when the studio was relocated to 6 East 14th Street. Cabinet cards published after 1914 indicate that he was joined in business by his son.

Published in: on August 15, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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RUFUS B. COWING: NEW YORK CITY JUDGE AND WALL STREET LAWYER

This cabinet card portrait features Rufus Billings Cowing, New York City Judge and Wall Street lawyer. The photograph was published  by Fredricks whose studio was located at Broadway and Ninth Street in New York City, New York. The New York Times (1906) reported Judge Cowing’s retirement from the bench of the Court of General Sessions. He had served for 28 years and had been involved in some sensational criminal and political corruption cases. His career was intertwined with the history of New York City. After leaving the courts, he entered private practice by joining his son’s firm on Wall Street. Cowing was born in Jamestown, New York in 1840. Cowing’s father died when Cowing was just 5 years old. At age 12, he came to New York City where he attended boarding school until he entered the Polytechnic Institute in Brooklyn from which he graduated in 1861. Next, he clerked at a bank for a short while and then decided to enter a law career. He worked for and studied at a New York City law firm for about two years and then entered Harvard University’s Law School, graduating in 1865. He practiced law in New York City and got involved in politics. He had an unsuccessful run for an assembly seat in 1875. He ran as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district and nearly won. Cowing was married twice and had children from both unions. He was married to Hester Tugnot (1866) and Marie Ling (1901). Cowing died in 1920. Charles DeForest Fredricks, the photographer of this image, was a well known New York City photographer who was known to have photographed many celebrities during his career.

LORRAINE DREUX: PRETTY STAGE ACTRESS DIES YOUNG AND TRAGICALLY

This cabinet card is a portrait of theatre actress, Lorraine Dreux. The  image is part of the Newsboy Series (#385) and was published in New York City. The Newsboy series was used for advertising purposes by the Newsboy Tobacco Company. Celebrity photographs were given away as premiums upon the sale of tobacco products.To view other Newsboy photographs, click on the category “Newsboy”. Ms. Dreux looks like she ran through the woods in order to arrive at the photography studio in a timely fashion. She has twigs and leaves on her head and even is wearing a necklace of branches around her shoulders. It seems she is modeling “the natural” look. Her eyes are looking upward, as if to say, “Am I really wearing sticks and leaves?”. Who was Lorraine Dreux? The Illustrated America (1893) describes her as “young and pretty, with soft dark eyes, a tremulous little mouth, and a dazzling complexion”. She was born in Marquette, Michigan, of well to do parents. Her father did a great deal of business in the East and she spent much time on the banks of the Hudson River in New York. She was educated at home by a governess supervised by Dreux’s beautiful mother. She decided that she wanted to be an actress while in her early teens. Her parents reluctantly gave her permission and her first experience acting occurred while she was in London, England, with her mother. She was engaged by Mr Charles Wyndham to play comedy parts in London stage shows. She next joined the London Globe Theatre Stock Company playing sentimental roles. She then joined an English traveling theatre company. She soon returned to America and appeared in a number of plays, including “Ninety Days” with William Gillette. The article closes with the prediction that Dreux would be a successful actress in America because she possessed both beauty and talent. The New York Times (1894) reported on Dreaux’s appearance in “Lem Kettle” at the Bijou theatre. She also appeared in “Rush City” (1894) which was staged in Brooklyn (New York), and also in “Nance Oldfield” (1896) in New York. The latter show starred Rose Coghlan and her portrait can be seen in the Cabinet Card Gallery by placing her name in the “search box”. Dreux appeared in one Broadway production, “The Spectator” (1896). The New York Dramatic Mirror (1908) reported the tragic death of Lorraine Dreux. She was described as a well known and capable leading women of many stock companies outside of New York City. She died in New York’s Bellvue Hospital at age 35. The article reports that she “had fallen on evil days” and was “too proud to let her friends know of her plight”. She let an illness go till it turned  into acute pneumonia which led to her death. Her last two engagements were in Worcester, Massachusetts and Rochester, New York. She received excellent reviews for her acting in both productions. However, her wardrobe was stolen and she was criticized for the way she dressed for her part in Rochester. She returned home “down hearted and discouraged” and sick, penniless and homeless. She met an old friend on the streets of New York who took her home to be fed and cared for but her condition worsened. A collection was made from other actors and actresses and the money was used to admit her to Bellvue Hospital where she died. Aid from the Actors Fund paid for her funeral and burial at Evergreen Cemetery.

THE LITTTLE ADMIRAL IN NEW YORK CITY: A BOY AND HIS BOAT

A young boy poses proudly wearing a very realistic looking naval uniform. He is standing next to his very detailed toy boat. The ship appears to be a war vessel and appears to be flying a flag similar to the flag of Great Britain. The little admiral was photographed by a New York City photographer named Acker.  Perhaps a visitor to the cabinet card gallery can identify the navy represented by the lads uniform and the vessel’s flag.

Published in: on April 15, 2012 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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TWO SALVATION ARMY LADIES IN NEW YORK CITY

Two young women in Salvation Army uniforms, pose for their portrait at the Carter Art Studio, in New York City, New York. Note that one woman is wearing Salvation Army pins on both collars and that both women are wearing Salvation Army badges at their collar. The woman appear to be in their twenties, and one wonders what motivated them to join the Salvation Army. Did they have religious convictions that drew them to the organization? Were they hoping to help people or change the world in a positive way? Did they see joining the Salvation Army as a way to be able to live in exciting New York City. Unfortunately, the answers to these questions are lost to history. To see a collection of images of other Salvation Army workers;click on the Cabinet Card Gallery’s category “Salvation Army”.

Published in: on March 30, 2011 at 4:26 pm  Comments (5)  
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