PORTRAIT OF ADORABLE SIBILINGS ESTER, OLGA, AND HAROLD MONSON IN SALEM, OREGON

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This vintage photograph features three adorable siblings. Their names, “Esther, Olga,and Harold Monson” are written on the reverse of the photo. The children are well dressed and are wearing wonderful smiles. The girls are clothed in identical white dresses with lace, and are wearing identical hair bows. Master Harold is dressed in a nautical themed outfit. The Monson siblings are listed in the 1910 US census. The family was living in Jefferson, Oregon. Esther C. Monson (1894-?), Olga Christine Monson (1896-1991), and Harold G. Monson (1898-1991) were living with their parents Olof and Anna Monson. The family had added a fourth child, Agnes D. Monson. When he wasn’t fathering children, Olof worked as a farmer. Olof and Anna were born in Sweden while the three children seen in the photograph were born in Iowa. The photographer of this lovely portrait is the Cronise Photo Studio which was located in Salem, Oregon. Thomas Jefferson Cronise (?-1927) was a very talented photographer. His work is recognized by the Oregon Historical Society, which possesses a large collection of his work. He is described as a man who was able to develop a great rapport with his subjects enabling him to capture their image after he helped them relax for the picture taking. Historians note that he was excellent at photographing peoples “fleeting expressions”. The material was donated in 1974 by Harry Wilmot Cronise, the final owner of Salem’s Cronise Studio, and Thomas’s son. Tom’s sister, Anna Louise worked for photographer Francis J. Catterlin in 1892 and purchased the studio less than a year later. Tom was a successful book and job printer and he began to assist his sister in operating the studio. By 1893, he had become his sister’s partner. After deciding to pursue a full time career as a photographer, Tom bought the Elite Studio in 1902 from Hart and McLennon and renamed the studio “The Tom Cronise Photo Studio”. Upon Tom’s death in 1927, his widow, Nellie, continued the business until 1930. She was succeeded by her and Tom’s son, Harry Cronise. A portrait of Tom Cronise can be seen below.

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Thomas Cronise

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Published in: on February 20, 2017 at 8:58 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A STRIKING WOMAN IN EUGENE, OREGON

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The young woman in this post cabinet card era photograph is strikingly attractive. She has wonderful eyes. She appears to be a teenager. The striking young lady is wearing a high collared and ruffled dress as well as a necklace. The photograph was taken at the Winter Photo Company in Eugene, Oregon. The photographer, John A. Winter was born in Ohio sometime around 1831. He was active in the photography business in Eugene between 1864 and 1869, and again between 1873 and 1900. During his career he also operated photography businesses in Albany, Brownsville, and Jefferson; all towns in Oregon.In 1864 he advertised that he intended to “devote his whole time to making pictures”. In 1865 he began his career operating photographic studios. A number of times during his career he was plagued with poor health. At one point he owned a sheep ranch in addition to a photography studio. Winter employed the bartering system in his business. One of his ads promises to trade portrait taking for firewood. From 1888 to 1900, Winter was the photographer of Oregon State University. Winter’s son, Clarence L. Winter was a photographer in Eugene between 1891 and 1906. However, a letter from C. L. Winter appears in the Photographic Times (1887) indicating that he likely began working in Eugene earlier than the aforementioned date. It is not clear whether John A. Winter or Clarence L. Winter is the photographer who produced the picture of this lovely young woman. Perusing the Cabinet Card Gallery’s collection of photographs by Mr Winter, it is clear that he had photographic talent. This photograph measures about 4 1/4″ x 4 1/2″. To view other photographs by Winter, click on the category “Photographer: Winter”.

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PORTRAIT OF LEE TONG: PASTOR OF THE BAPTIST CHINESE CHURCH IN PORTLAND OREGON

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This photograph features a well dressed young Asian man sitting in a chair with his hat on his lap. He is is exhibiting an intense gaze at the photographer. On the reverse of this photograph is an inscription that informs us about the identity of this gentleman. His name is Lee Tong and he was a clergyman who attended the Eugene Bible University in Eugene, Oregon. The American Home Missionary (1913) journal lists him as a preacher. He also appears in the Portland directory as Reverend Lee Tong (1912-1914). A book entitled “Portland, Oregon: Its History and Builders” reports that he was the Pastor of the Baptist Chinese Church. Research reveals that the Eugene Bible College is now known as New Hope Christian College and it is located in Eugene. The school was founded by Fred Hornshuh in 1925. This photograph was taken at the Brown Studio in Portland, Oregon.

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PORTRAIT OF A GUITAR PLAYING WOMAN TAKEN ON A RAILROAD PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO CAR

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A young woman plays the guitar as she poses for her portrait by a railroad photographer. The Fallman studio was actually located on a train car. Printing on the front of the cabinet card notes that the photographer utilized a Parlor Photo Car. Some photographers, like Mr. Fallman, would rent or purchase a railroad car and travel from town to town. Sometimes the car would be disconnected from the train and the photographer would operate his studio until business conditions dictated that he move on to another locale. Fallman’s parlor car obviously contained backdrops and props. The woman in this photograph is sitting on a hammock next to a box topped with a couple of books. Preliminary research failed to uncover details about Mr. Fallman. However, the Cabinet Card Gallery possesses a vintage photograph of a cute little girl by Harry Fallman (1853-1907). His studio was located in Eureka, South Dakota. During his lifetime, Harry also lived and worked as a photographer in North Newberg and Portland, Oregon. It is unknown if Harry is the same Fallman who operated the rail car studio that produced the photograph above. To view Harry Fallman’s photograph and to learn more about him (and his celebrity son), click on the category “Photographer: Fallman”.

 

 

SMILING COUPLE POSE IN A FAUX GARDEN: WHY IS THIS WOMAN HOLDING A WHIP? (REAL PHOTO POSTCARD)

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This vintage real photo postcard (RPPC) features a smiling couple posing in a photographic studio’s faux garden.  Note the leaves affixed to the wall behind them. This couple seems very happy together but they apparently didn’t maintain their marital harmony because they ultimately got divorced. One hopes that the whip that the woman is holding had nothing to do with their marital discord. The woman’s name in this photograph is Grace McBurney. Her name is written on the reverse of the postcard, undoubtedly by one of her relatives. Research reveals that Grace R. McBurney (1893-1969) was born in Oregon and married at the age of 19 to William H. McBurney who worked as a “typewriter representative”, which I assume means he sold typewriters. The couple had at least five children: Virginia D.(born around 1914), Marguerite F. (1919-1999), Wilma (born around 1920), William (1923-1981), and Carl Morton (1928-2007). Perusal of US census data reveals that the couple were divorced sometime between 1930 and 1940. It appears that Grace lived her entire adult life in Portland, Oregon. She is buried in Lincoln Memorial Park in Portland. Preliminary research yielded little information about her husband. This photo postcard was produced by the Mazeograph Studio in Portland. The studio’s stamp can be seen on the reverse of the postcard. The stamp also mentions that the photo production process took only ten minutes.The postcard paper was produced by Cyko sometime between 1906 and 1915. Charles E. (Cal) Calvert operated his studio at Sixth & Ankeny from 1906 through 1930. In 1907, with the opening of Council Crest Amusement Park, he operated a studio and postcard stand on it’s grounds. He also ran a studio at the Washington Street entrance to Portland’s City Park in 1910. Cal was known for his use of rustic props and for his creativity. One of his sets involved subjects appearing as if they were flying an airplane over the city of Portland. A postcard employing this setting is part of a collection at the Portland Art Museum. As a side note, there was also a Calvert’s Studio across from Oregon City’s Southern Pacific Depot but it was run by Harry Calvert and his wife Alvilda. Harry was not related to Cal Calvert. Harry’s studio operated from 1915 through 1925.

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THE WORLDS SWEETEST BABY STANDS ON A CHAIR IN PORTLAND, OREGON

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This cabinet card portrait features a thirteen month old baby who an inscriber on the reverse of the photograph describes as the “Sweetest in the world”. The child’s name is written as “Dagmar Albright Games. The child in this photograph does in fact look quite sweet and is flashing a wonderful expression. The kid was born to model. She is standing on a velvet chair and is wearing some sort of a flimsy gown. The photograph was taken at the Busby & Company Studio in Portland, Oregon. Research reveals that according to the the 1910 US Census, Dagmar A. Games was living in Portland (Ward 4), Oregon.. She was 21 years old (born in 1889), unemployed and living in a boarding house. The 1920 census indicates that she was married to Frederick Swanberg who was employed as a manager of an ice company. Dagmar was unemployed and she and her husband were living in San Francisco. Dagmar’s mother, Anna Games, was living with the couple. The 1930 US Census discloses that Dagmar and her mother still lived in San Francisco but Frederick no longer resided with them.

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Published in: on October 27, 2015 at 12:00 pm  Comments (4)  
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PORTRAIT OF TWO YOUNG GIRLS AND A DOLL (VINTAGE REAL PHOTO POSTCARD)

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This vintage real photo postcard features a portrait of two young girls and a doll. One of the girls is sitting in a wicker chair with the doll on her lap but the second girl has her hand on the doll as if she is saying “this doll is mine too”. The photograph of the girls seems to have been taken outside or else the photographer has a great backdrop and is very good at setting a scene. The girl’s names are written on the reverse of the postcard. “Dorothy and Margirie Warfield” are probably sisters. A quick genealogical search discovered that the 1910 US census lists sisters named Dorothy (age 3) and Marjory (infant) Wharfield (also spelled Warfield). The sisters and the rest of their family lived in Portland, Oregon. The girl’s parents were Arthur (age 29) and Gertrude (age 28). Arthur worked as a merchant (furniture store). It is very possible that the girls in the census are the same as the girls in the photograph. This postcard has a CYKO stamp box which indicates that it was produced sometime between 1904 and the 1920’s.

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ADORABLE LITTLE GIRL IN EUREKA, SOUTH DAKOTA AND HER CONNECTION TO THE MAN FROM PLANET X

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This vintage photograph features a well dressed cute little girl. She is displaying a serious expression as photographer Harry Fallman (1853-1917)  tries to capture the moment. Fallman’s studio was located in Eureka, South Dakota. The 1900 US census indicates that Fallman was born in New York but living in Eureka with his wife Nina A. Fallman (born 1864) and son Gilbert (born 1897). At the time of the census, Fallman was working as a photographer. The 1910 US census finds the 58 year-old Fallman living in North Newberg, Oregon. Apparently he experienced a mid life crisis because he had acquired a new wife (Emily Fallman) and she was just 27 years old. Fallman is listed in Portland, Oregon city directories (1913-1916) as working as a photographer. However, in the 1917 directory it is apparent that he switched careers and had become a grocer. An interesting side note concerns Fallman’s son. Gilbert Fallman (1897-1984) became an actor. Among his best known roles were appearances in “One Too Many (1950)” and “The Man from Planet X (1951)”.

PORTRAIT OF OLIN CLARK: ADORABLE BLONDE LITTLE BOY FROM PORTLAND, OREGON

olin 1The subject of this vintage photographic portrait is Olin B. Clark (1900-1939) and he was photographed by A. G. Churchley of Portland, Oregon. Young Olin looks a bit intimidated by his photo shoot. He also looks very cute in his sailor type outfit. The 1910 US census finds young Olin living with his parents in Portland. His father, William C. Clark worked as a trolley conductor while his mother (Louisa F. Clark) was a homemaker. The 1920 US census revealed that Olin worked as an airplane mechanic in Portland where he lived as a boarder.

 

Published in: on March 6, 2015 at 12:38 pm  Comments (1)  
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HATTIE AND EMMA: FASHIONISTAS IN DALLAS, OREGON

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This cabinet card portrait presents a fashion mystery. What is the story behind the clothing that these two women are wearing? The previous owner of this photograph called the women “trendy” and stated that they were wearing “Victorian Bohemian” style dresses. I’m wondering if the women are wearing leather dresses. These women are certainly making a fashion statement. The women appear to be wearing slenderizing corsets. One is wearing a choker while the other is wearing a necklace. The woman on the left is holding what appears to be a sheet of paper. It is not clear why she would be posed holding a sheet of paper. The reverse of the cabinet card paper has an inscription which identifies these two women as “Hattie Williams Rhodes” and “Emma Black”. Miss Rhodes is standing on the left of the image while Miss Black stands the right. The photographer of this portrait is R. B. Collins and he operated a photography studio in Dallas, Oregon.

 

Published in: on November 26, 2014 at 10:12 pm  Comments (5)  
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