PORTRAIT OF FIVE UNIFORMED POLICE OFFICERS IN SOMERSWORTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE

This vintage photograph features five uniformed police officers posing for their portrait in Somersworth, New Hampshire. These lawmen appear very serious judging by their expressions. Mustaches must have been in vogue considering that only one of the five men is without one. The photographer of this image was Burton Etter. He was born in 1863 in Nova Scotia, Canada. He became a naturalized US citizen in 1881. He married Helen M Mason in 1892. It was his second marriage. His first marriage (1885-1891) ended in divorce. In an 1886 business directory he is listed as an employee in a boot factory. At least by 1892 he was working as a photographer in Dover, New Hampshire. His name appears in Dover directories as a proprietor of a photography studio through 1909. After that time, he moved to San Francisco where he worked as a photographer at least until 1930. He was still alive at the time of the 1940 US census. Photographer guides indicate that Etter had other studios besides the ones in Dover and Somersworth. This is a terrific occupational/police photograph.

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Published in: on October 11, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
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CHARLES HENRY PARKHURST: CLERGYMAN, SOCIAL REFORMER, CROOKED POLITICIAN’S AND CORRUPT POLICEMAN’S NIGHTMARE (1892)

 

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Charles Henry Parkhurst (1842-1933) is the subject of these Cabinet Card photographs which are published by Newsboy. Photographer Napoleon Sarony has the 1892 copyright for the top photograph. The second photograph is marked “375” and is part of Newsboy’s tobacco premium series. Parkhurst was a clergyman and social reformer. He was a presbyterian minister and from 1874 until 1880, he was a pastor in Lenox, Massachusetts. He then became the pastor for Madison Square Presbyterian Church in New York City (1880-1919). During the year of this photograph, Parkhurst began giving tough sermons attacking the political corruption in the New York City government. This led to the exposure of the corruption in Tammany Hall and subsequent social and political reform. He had a special concern about the problem of prostitution in New York City’s tenderloin section. He hired private detectives to investigate the houses of ill repute and their police protection. Concerning the police, he said “while we fight iniquity they shield or patronize it; while we try to convert criminals, they manufacture them”. He took his concerns and investigative results to court on these matters. He was President of the New York Society for the Prevention of Crime and published numerous magazine articles and books. Parkhurst died tragically; while sleep walking he fell off the second story porch of his home.