A WOMAN WEARING GLASSES IN CLAREMONT, NEW HAMPSHIRE

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Alonzo Harlow is the photographer of this cabinet card image of a woman wearing glasses. The woman is wearing a fur trimmed dress or jacket as well as a headband and earrings. This photograph was taken in Harlow’s Claremont studio. Alonzo Harlow is listed in the 1880 US census as being a native of Vermont and as living in Montpelier with his wife and a boarder. Alonzo (age 32) worked as a photographic artist. His wife Lucy (age 27) kept house, and the boarder, George Dale (age 23) also worked as a photographer. Alonzo was listed in the 1890 through 1892 Montpelier city directories as a photographer. The 1900 census found Harlow living in Boston, Massachusetts and working as a real estate clerk.  To view other photographs by Harlow, click on the category “Photographer: Harlow”.

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Published in: on June 8, 2016 at 12:00 pm  Comments (2)  
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AMOS RHEAUME AND FAMILY POSE FOR PORTRAIT IN KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE

keane familyAmos Rheaume and his family pose for their portrait at the studio of W. G. Freeman in Keene, New Hampshire. Amos and his wife and three children comprise an attractive family. W. G. Freeman was a photographer in Keene between 1901 and 1905. At some point he moved his business to Bellow Falls, Vermont where he appears in city directories from at least 1910 through 1918.

 

Published in: on December 29, 2014 at 12:34 pm  Comments (1)  
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A LITTLE BOY DRESSED IN A SAILOR SUIT POSES FOR HIS PORTRAIT IN BARRE, VERMONT

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A young boy wearing a sailor suit poses for his portrait at the Clark studio in Barre, Vermont. The boy is well dressed and very clean cut. A. F. Clark is listed as a photographer in a Barre business directory from 1891. He is also listed in the 1900 US census as a single 41 year-old photographer.

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Published in: on February 20, 2014 at 12:17 pm  Leave a Comment  
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PORTRAIT OF A NEW ENGLAND GENTLEMAN

VERMONT MAN_0001The identity of the gentleman pictured in this cabinet card portrait is Caleb Lysander. The previous owner of this image reported that it comes from an album that makes this positive identification. The subject has an interesting billy goat beard. To view other notable beards, click on the category “Beards (Only the Best)”. The cabinet card was produced by the Howe studio which was located in Brattleboro, Vermont. A Brattleboro history internet site includes a biography and obituary of Mr. Caleb Lysander Howe. The article states that upon his death, his daughter, Mrs Mary Howe-Lavin was informed via cable to Paris where she was performing as a singer. Howe was born in Dummerston, Vermont, in 1811. At age two, he moved with his parents to Dover, Vermont. His father worked as a farmer and had a second business providing transportation between Dover and Boston. Howe worked on the family farm until he was about sixteen when he went to learn a trade as a machinist. At age eighteen he moved to Brattleboro to work in a machine shop. While in the role of machinist, he worked as a watchmaker and producer of jewelry. He married Miss Cynthia Sherman who was from Dover. In 1838 he leased a farm in Dover. He became interested in photography in about 1846 and soon purchased a photography studio where he started out producing daguerreotypes. He then purchased a four wheel car for three hundred dollars and added traveling photographer to his job description. He did most of his work within his county. It is reported that he made a profit of between one hundred and two hundred dollars a month. He came to Brattleboro in 1856 and purchased a photography gallery. He became quite successful as a photographer. In 1880 his son, John C. Howe became associated with the business and the studio became known as  C. L. Howe & Son. The senior Mr. Howe was highly regarded throughout the county as a teacher of vocal music and as a tenor singer. He died in 1895. There is a possibility that this is a self portrait. In other words, Caleb Lysander Howe may be the subject and the photographer.  Research found an engraved portrait of Howe that looks similar to this cabinet card image. As a side note, research found a number of references to C. L. Howes prima donna daughter. The book “Picturesque Brattleboro: With Over Two Hundred Illustrations (1894) describes Mary Howe-Lavin as a “beautiful songstress” and states that “there is something indescribably fascinating in the singing and personal appearance of this charming woman”. References reveal that she performed in a number of major cities in Germany. Her second wedding was announced in the New York Times (1905).

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CUTEST DOG IN BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT (1892)

BRIDGEPORT DOG_0007Photographers Seeley & Warnock took this photograph of a cute dog posing in their studio in Bridgeport, Connecticut. What a pose?  The photographers have captured this adorable canine exhibiting a smile (with his/her mouth open). The lighting utilized in this photograph could have been better, but lets remember that dogs are tough customers for a photographer. On the reverse of the cabinet card is advertising that states “Instantaneous Portraits of Children A Successful Specialty”.  Note that photographing children is not only a “specialty” but it is a “successful specialty”. Additional printing on the reverse of the cabinet card indicates that it was produced in 1892. Preliminary research found no information about Mr. Warnock but there is an abundance of information about Mr. Seeley. Henry James Seeley was well known in Grand Army of the Republic circles. He was a department commander (Connecticut) and served in national offices of the organization. He was born in Jericho, Vermont in 1849. At the age of fifteen he enlisted in the 10th Indiana Battery, Light Artillery. After serving with the unit he was transferred to the gunboat Stone River which was operating on the Tennessee River. His next post was Fort Johnson in Huntsville, Indiana. Seeley entered and left the military as a private. After mustering out of the military in 1865, he taught school in Carbondale, Illinois. He then went to Vermont to further his education and then had teaching stints in Rome (NY), Worcester, Fall River and Bridgewater (MA). In 1872 he moved to Bridgeport where he studied photography and finally settled down. He opened a photography studio there in 1872 at 922 Main Street. He spent the next forty-five years or more working as a photographer.

OLD WOMAN WITH GLASSES IN MONTPELIER, VERMONT

An elderly woman with a solemn expression poses for her portrait at the Harlow studio in Montpelier, Vermont. She is wearing wire rimmed glasses. Alonzo Harlow is listed in the 1880 US census as being a native of Vermont and as living in Montpelier with his wife and a boarder. Alonzo (age 32) worked as a photographic artist. His wife Lucy (age 27) kept house, and the boarder, George Dale (age 23) also worked as a photographer. Alonzo was listed in the 1890 through 1892 Montpelier city directories as a photographer. The 1900 census found Harlow living in Boston, Massachusetts and working as a real estate clerk.  To view other photographs by Harlow, click on the category “Photographer: Harlow”. To view other images of older subjects, click on the category “Elderly”.

Published in: on September 6, 2012 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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ATTRACTIVE WOMAN WITH A TALL FANCY HAT AND A SCARF IN PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS

An attractive woman with a tall fancy hat and a scarf poses for her portrait at the Clark studio in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. The photographer of this image is Forester Clark. He was cited in the Photographic Times (1988) because his eight year=old daughter Eva wrote a letter to then President Grover Cleveland which included six winter and six summer views of Pittsfield street scenes. She received a reply from the President with the salutation of “My Dear Young Friend”,  and the letter went on to say, among other things, that he found the photographs very interesting. Clark is also mentioned in the Photographic Journal of America (1893) for announcing that he was leaving Pittsfield (he lived there 21 years) and moving to Montpelier, Vermont to become treasurer of the Excelsior Granite Works. The article reported that Clark had taken 31,000 negatives while in Pittsfield. Clark was a veteran of the civil war. He enlisted in 1861 and was discharged in 1862 with the rank of Private. He was a member of the 5th Wisconsin Infantry. The 1880 US census reveals that Clark was born in Vermont in 1836. He married his wife, Emma, in 1862. He had four children aged one through thirteen. The 1900 census found Clark living in the Bronx, New York with his wife and two of his children. He was employed as a granite salesman. The 1910 census indicates that Clark was living in Cheshire, Massachusetts with his wife and that at 73 years-old, he was working once again as a photographer.

MOTHERS, DAUGHTERS AND SISTERS IN SAXTONS RIVER, VERMONT

This cabinet card, photographed by P. W. Taft, features two young adult women and two young girls. Perhaps the two older girls are sisters and the two young girls are daughters of the older woman. The family constellation in this image is impossible to determine. It is interesting to note that the two little girls are both wearing dresses styled after a sailor suit. The two dresses are similar, but not identical. Taft’s studio was located in Saxtons River, Vermont. To view other photographs by Taft, click on the category “Photographer: Taft”. Preston William Taft (1826-1901) was listed in the Windham County Business Directory 1884) as having a photography business in Saxtons River. Research reveals that he established a Daguerreotype, and later Photography business in 1856 and operated the studio until 1878. He was married in 1850 to Rose Melissa Miller and the couple had three sons and a daughter. Sons Frank (born 1851), Charles (born 1863), and Edward (born 1868), all became photographers. The daughter’s name was Nettie (born 1865). It is likely that this cabinet card was produced by one of P. W. Taft’s sons since, judging by characteristics of the cabinet card, it was likely photographed after he had left the business. To view other photographs by P. W. Taft, click on the category “Photographer: Taft”.

Published in: on January 31, 2012 at 12:01 am  Comments (1)  
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THE SHEPARD FAMILY CONCERT COMPANY

This cabinet card features a portrait of the Shepard Family Concert Company. In this photograph, mother is playing the piano (or organ) and the five children and their father are playing violins. The photographer of this cabinet card is unknown, as is the location of the studio. A photograph of the Shepard family and their instruments appears in The Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont (located in Middlebury, Vermont). In addition, the museum possesses a “cigar ribbon quilt” serving as a piano cover. The quilt is made from silken advertising ribbons which cigar companies used to tie cigars together for packaging purposes. This particular quilt was made by Mary Emily Shepard (“Minnie”), the matriarch of the Shepard Family. The Shepard Family was Massachusetts based, and mostly toured upper New England. The musical group venues included the Town Hall Theatre, in Middlebury, Vermont. Family Musical Troupes were popular in the 1880’s and 1890’s.  Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Shepard  and their children, Kittie, Laura, Lessie, Georgie, and Burtin were regionally well known and appreciated in the late nineteenth century. Each family member were multi instrumentalists. The family could perform as a choral group, a brass band, or a violin ensemble with the mother playing the pump reed organ. In addition, sometimes, the children would perform as a banjo quintet.

A FAMILY PORTRAIT IN BELLOWS FALLS, VERMONT

This cabinet card features at attractive family posing for their portrait at the studio of Frederick J. Blake, in Bellows Falls, Vermont. Mom and Dad are accompanied by their two sons and three daughters. Blake is listed in the Windham County Business Directory (1884).

Published in: on August 30, 2011 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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