PRETTY PRIMA DONNA: MINNIE ASHLEY

This vintage real photo postcard features theater actress Minnie Ashley (1878-1946). She was one of the great “stage beauties” of the end of the 19th century. She was a talented singer and dancer and she was featured in the madcap musical “1492” (1892). In Boston she performed with the Museum Company and in New York she was a member of the Augustin Daly Company. She had many successes including her performance in “A Country Girl”, “Wang”, and “San Troy”. Her acting resulted in a medical problem. The prolonged exposure to theatrical arc lights caused vision problems. In 1902 she left her acting career and married politician William Astor Chanler who was an affluent grandson of John Jacob Astor. Medical treatment did not help her vision problems and Miss Ashley than put her efforts into sculpting. Chanler and Ashley separated in 1909. She made an attempt at returning to the stage in 1911 but soon opted to pursue her sculpting. During her artistic career she worked under the name of Beatrice Ashley Chanler. In addition to the sculpting, she was active in philanthropy. The book “Famous Prima Donnas” (1900) by Lewis Clinton Strang, devotes a chapter to Minnie Ashley. He describes her as having “artless girlishness, remarkable personal charm, and skill as an imaginative dancer scarcely equalled on the American stage”. He adds that these talents explain her “sudden success” in musical comedy. He describes her dancing as “artistic in every sense” but asserts she was not exceptionally talented in the realm of acting and singing. However, Strang is very complimentary of Ashley’s appearance. He states “nature was indeed good to her when it endowed her with a most fascinating personality, a pretty piquant face, and a slim graceful figure. This postcard was published by the Rotograph Company (New York) and was part of a series (no. B 174).                                                                                                The second postcard has the same portrait of Miss Ashley except the image is color tinted. It became common practice around 1902 to hand color photo postcards. Rising labor costs led to the decreasing use of this practice after the 1930’s.  This postcard, like the one above it, was produced by the Rotograph Company (New York) and was part of a series (H.B. 14/30). The postcard was mailed and has a 1910 postmark from Warren, Ohio.

                                                                                                                                          REVERSE OF TOP POSTCARD
ashley 2                                                                                                                                      REVERSE OF BOTTOM POSTCARD

CABINET CARD PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG CHILD AND A STACK OF CABINET CARDS

This cabinet card portrait of a young child is a bit unusual because the image features other cabinet cards within it. The child is intensely staring at the photographer while holding a cabinet card in his/her hand. There is a stack of cabinet cards lying on the table. One can imagine that the photographer decided to use the cabinet cards as a prop for this image. The photographer of this image is Luther M. Rice. Mr Rice is a familiar name to the Cabinet Card Gallery. The gallery features a photograph by Charles E. Holman, the brother-in-law of Luther Rice. Rice taught Holman the photography business. The pair worked together for a number of years and in 1879 Rice sold the studio to Holman. Rice was born in Massachusetts in about 1886. In addition to being a photographer, he was also a watercolorist. He began working in Warren (Ohio) by 1868. He partnered with Isaac D. Bliss in 1870 and worked independently from 1875 until 1891. He also had a studio in Chagrin Falls (1896-1897). All dates mentioned in this brief career biography are approximate. Rice’s obituary appeared in the “Bulletin of Photography” (1913). He was 86 years old at the time of his death.

Published in: on March 31, 2017 at 12:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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